Date   

Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Rowland
 

Sounds like it may be time again to have a presentation, as an Elmer night, on car packs, etc.  No time like the present.

 

Thanks,

 

Rowland

 

From: snovarc@groups.io <snovarc@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2019 4:08 PM
To: snovarc@groups.io
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

 

Yup! I gave the toned down "probably not a good idea" version of that, lol.


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 2:35 PM, Jackson Beard < macleanofduart@...> wrote:

 

Carrying Rx controlled substance medications outside of a labeled bottle is a felony in Washington.

 

RCW 69.50.309.

 

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:27 Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io <louis.giliberto=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

I think for something like oxycotin it should be in an rx bottle with a label. Things might turn out ok but I think walking around with those in a plastic bag is considered suspicious 😉

Otherwise sounds like a great bag! I need to make one, especially for my motorcycle rides. Thanks for sharing!


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 10:17 AM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) < w7pfb@...> wrote:


As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

 

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

 

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

 

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.

* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.

* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.

* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).

* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  

* a hothands chemical hand warmer

* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.

* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen

* lip balm

* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.

* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

 

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!



On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

 

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

 

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

 

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

 

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

 

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:

* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.

* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.

* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets

* vetwrap tape.  

* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.

* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.

* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

 

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

 

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!



On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

 

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:

  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp


I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:

  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction

Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO

<Emergency Modules.docx>

 

 


Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW)
 

Yup! I gave the toned down "probably not a good idea" version of that, lol.


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 2:35 PM, Jackson Beard < macleanofduart@...> wrote:

Carrying Rx controlled substance medications outside of a labeled bottle is a felony in Washington.

RCW 69.50.309.

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:27 Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io <louis.giliberto=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think for something like oxycotin it should be in an rx bottle with a label. Things might turn out ok but I think walking around with those in a plastic bag is considered suspicious 😉

Otherwise sounds like a great bag! I need to make one, especially for my motorcycle rides. Thanks for sharing!


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 10:17 AM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) < w7pfb@...> wrote:

As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.
* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.
* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.
* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).
* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  
* a hothands chemical hand warmer
* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.
* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen
* lip balm
* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.
* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:
* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.
* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.
* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets
* vetwrap tape.  
* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.
* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.
* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:
  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp

I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:
  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction
Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO
<Emergency Modules.docx>



Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

Just figured that out.  Thanks for the clarification, Jackson.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 21, 2019, at 2:56 PM, Jackson Beard <macleanofduart@...> wrote:

BP meds are RX but not controlled. 

Controlled is stuff that has potential for abuse. 

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:50 Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...> wrote:
Interesting.  So, when I dole out two weeks worth of my BP meds into my ’14 chambers, one for every day of two weeks’ med and vitamin thingie, I’m committing a felony.

Anyway thanks for the heads up.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 21, 2019, at 2:35 PM, Jackson Beard <macleanofduart@...> wrote:

Carrying Rx controlled substance medications outside of a labeled bottle is a felony in Washington.

RCW 69.50.309.

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:27 Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io <louis.giliberto=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think for something like oxycotin it should be in an rx bottle with a label. Things might turn out ok but I think walking around with those in a plastic bag is considered suspicious 😉

Otherwise sounds like a great bag! I need to make one, especially for my motorcycle rides. Thanks for sharing!


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 10:17 AM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) < w7pfb@...> wrote:

As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.
* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.
* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.
* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).
* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  
* a hothands chemical hand warmer
* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.
* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen
* lip balm
* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.
* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:
* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.
* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.
* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets
* vetwrap tape.  
* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.
* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.
* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:
  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp

I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:
  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction
Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO
<Emergency Modules.docx>









Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Jackson Beard
 

BP meds are RX but not controlled. 

Controlled is stuff that has potential for abuse. 

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:50 Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...> wrote:
Interesting.  So, when I dole out two weeks worth of my BP meds into my ’14 chambers, one for every day of two weeks’ med and vitamin thingie, I’m committing a felony.

Anyway thanks for the heads up.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 21, 2019, at 2:35 PM, Jackson Beard <macleanofduart@...> wrote:

Carrying Rx controlled substance medications outside of a labeled bottle is a felony in Washington.

RCW 69.50.309.

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:27 Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io <louis.giliberto=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think for something like oxycotin it should be in an rx bottle with a label. Things might turn out ok but I think walking around with those in a plastic bag is considered suspicious 😉

Otherwise sounds like a great bag! I need to make one, especially for my motorcycle rides. Thanks for sharing!


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 10:17 AM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) < w7pfb@...> wrote:

As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.
* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.
* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.
* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).
* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  
* a hothands chemical hand warmer
* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.
* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen
* lip balm
* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.
* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:
* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.
* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.
* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets
* vetwrap tape.  
* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.
* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.
* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:
  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp

I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:
  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction
Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO
<Emergency Modules.docx>






Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

Interesting.  So, when I dole out two weeks worth of my BP meds into my ’14 chambers, one for every day of two weeks’ med and vitamin thingie, I’m committing a felony.

Anyway thanks for the heads up.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 21, 2019, at 2:35 PM, Jackson Beard <macleanofduart@...> wrote:

Carrying Rx controlled substance medications outside of a labeled bottle is a felony in Washington.

RCW 69.50.309.

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:27 Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io <louis.giliberto=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think for something like oxycotin it should be in an rx bottle with a label. Things might turn out ok but I think walking around with those in a plastic bag is considered suspicious 😉

Otherwise sounds like a great bag! I need to make one, especially for my motorcycle rides. Thanks for sharing!


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 10:17 AM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) < w7pfb@...> wrote:

As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.
* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.
* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.
* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).
* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  
* a hothands chemical hand warmer
* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.
* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen
* lip balm
* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.
* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:
* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.
* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.
* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets
* vetwrap tape.  
* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.
* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.
* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:
  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp

I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:
  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction
Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO
<Emergency Modules.docx>






Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Jackson Beard
 

Up to one ounce in king county.  Votes matter, even for prosecutors. 


On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:37 Mike Jacob <golferguy02@...> wrote:
Yet carrying heroin is not.  

What a world...


From: snovarc@groups.io <snovarc@groups.io> on behalf of Jackson Beard <macleanofduart@...>
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2019 2:35 PM
To: snovarc@groups.io <snovarc@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag
 
Carrying Rx controlled substance medications outside of a labeled bottle is a felony in Washington.

RCW 69.50.309.

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:27 Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io <louis.giliberto=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think for something like oxycotin it should be in an rx bottle with a label. Things might turn out ok but I think walking around with those in a plastic bag is considered suspicious 😉

Otherwise sounds like a great bag! I need to make one, especially for my motorcycle rides. Thanks for sharing!


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 10:17 AM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) < w7pfb@...> wrote:

As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.
* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.
* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.
* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).
* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  
* a hothands chemical hand warmer
* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.
* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen
* lip balm
* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.
* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:
* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.
* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.
* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets
* vetwrap tape.  
* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.
* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.
* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:
  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp

I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:
  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction
Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO
<Emergency Modules.docx>



Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Mike Jacob
 

Yet carrying heroin is not.  

What a world...


From: snovarc@groups.io <snovarc@groups.io> on behalf of Jackson Beard <macleanofduart@...>
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2019 2:35 PM
To: snovarc@groups.io <snovarc@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag
 
Carrying Rx controlled substance medications outside of a labeled bottle is a felony in Washington.

RCW 69.50.309.

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:27 Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io <louis.giliberto=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think for something like oxycotin it should be in an rx bottle with a label. Things might turn out ok but I think walking around with those in a plastic bag is considered suspicious 😉

Otherwise sounds like a great bag! I need to make one, especially for my motorcycle rides. Thanks for sharing!


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 10:17 AM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) < w7pfb@...> wrote:

As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.
* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.
* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.
* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).
* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  
* a hothands chemical hand warmer
* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.
* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen
* lip balm
* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.
* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:
* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.
* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.
* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets
* vetwrap tape.  
* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.
* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.
* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:
  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp

I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:
  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction
Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO
<Emergency Modules.docx>



Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Jackson Beard
 

Carrying Rx controlled substance medications outside of a labeled bottle is a felony in Washington.

RCW 69.50.309.

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 14:27 Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io <louis.giliberto=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think for something like oxycotin it should be in an rx bottle with a label. Things might turn out ok but I think walking around with those in a plastic bag is considered suspicious 😉

Otherwise sounds like a great bag! I need to make one, especially for my motorcycle rides. Thanks for sharing!


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 10:17 AM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) < w7pfb@...> wrote:

As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.
* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.
* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.
* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).
* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  
* a hothands chemical hand warmer
* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.
* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen
* lip balm
* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.
* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:
* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.
* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.
* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets
* vetwrap tape.  
* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.
* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.
* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:
  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp

I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:
  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction
Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO
<Emergency Modules.docx>



Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW)
 

I think for something like oxycotin it should be in an rx bottle with a label. Things might turn out ok but I think walking around with those in a plastic bag is considered suspicious 😉

Otherwise sounds like a great bag! I need to make one, especially for my motorcycle rides. Thanks for sharing!


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 21, 2019, 10:17 AM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) < w7pfb@...> wrote:

As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.
* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.
* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.
* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).
* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  
* a hothands chemical hand warmer
* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.
* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen
* lip balm
* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.
* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:
* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.
* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.
* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets
* vetwrap tape.  
* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.
* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.
* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:
  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp

I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:
  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction
Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO
<Emergency Modules.docx>



Re: Car Winter Go Bag

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

As Mel suggested I’m reviewing our car bags (which are, in fact, actually ‘get home’ bags). Each year it seems the contents of the bags shift a little bit.  Paula and I have doing a modest amount of running races where the distance is considerably longer than a marathon, and that’s both changed our ability to cover distance on foot and changed our understanding of what we need to do that.

For long runs which are unsupported even if we are being very minimal we carry what we call an ‘oh, sh*t’ bag - a quart ziplock that contains things you might need.  Not quite a first aid kit, but along those lines, augmented with stuff you might need if things go wahoonie shaped.

Anyway it occurred to me that even if you have limited space you could throw such a bag in your glovebox and if you’re forced to abandon your vehicle you could then just stuff the ziplock in a jacket pocket and carry on, and the contents might make quite a bit of difference.

* a Petzl e+lite headlamp.  Powered by two CR2032 batteries it can give you enough light to move easily in the dark.  15 lumens for 12 hours or 50 lumens for 9.  Batteries good in storage for 10 years.
* a few band-aid gel blister bandages.
* half a dozen twist top lancets like those used for blood glucose meters - useful for lancing blisters.  If you’re not regularly walking/running long distances, you *will* get blisters.
* a sheet or two of Tegaderm bandage.  (basically just plastic film, can cover a large area).
* one or two Gu carbohydrate gels.  100 calories per gel.  
* a hothands chemical hand warmer
* a modest amount of ibuprofen for normal aches and pains, and several oxycontin for more severe issues.
* a 1 oz squeeze bottle of sunscreen
* lip balm
* lube (we use Bodyglide) for chafing, either clothing on skin or skin on skin.
* a very small knife (we use the Gerber LST Ultralite)

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 3, 2019, at 5:15 PM, Lindy KG7IFA via Groups.Io <lindyforbarclays@...> wrote:

Good info Paul.  Also, I just received this useful link from WSDOT: https://www.wsdot.com/WINTER/


-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
To: snovarc <snovarc@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 2, 2019 8:56 am
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Car Winter Go Bag

Thanks for sharing your lists, Mel!

My comments on emergency bags in general, and not at all directed at Mel’s arrangement:

* It’s really worth identifying what scenarios you’re trying to address *before* you start making lists and assembling bags.  Is the bag intended to be the resources you need to shelter in place, or is it the resources you’ll need to get home if you have to abandon your vehicle?  (The bags Paula and I have in each vehicle are ‘get home’ bags).

* Anything that requires skills to use is useless if you lack those skills.  So: tools are useless unless you can use them to fix things (and tools are generally heavy).  A commercially available first aid kit probably contains things you don’t know know how to use.  I’ve tried to light fires using a spark stick thing and concluded it’s just dead weight for me.

Things that are in our bags that I generally don’t see in other people’s bags:
* collapsable bottles to hold water for purification.
* chemical handwarmers - I’ve had frightening brushes with hypothermia.  A handwarmer can be a lifesaver.  The ‘Hothands’ brand is our preference.
* Heatsheets Bivvy Sacks - more robust and better than mylar blankets
* vetwrap tape.  
* large trash bags - can be a poncho, can be a groundsheet, generally useful and lightweight.
* an inventory list of what’s in the bag.  Trust me, six months from now you will not remember what the heck is in the bag.  Resources you don’t know you have are essentially useless to you.
* in our bags items are grouped in ziplock bags, with each bag labeled (e.g. “light/heat”, “food/water”, “hygiene”, etc.) to make it easy to find stuff.  If you use the bag you’re going to be stressed and easily frustrated.

And finally: skills and fitness are more useful than gear.  It’s better to take a first aid course than buy a first aid kit and throw it in your trunk.  It’s better to get fit enough to walk home than it is to put together a get home bag in the unreasonable expectation that you’ll be able to carry it home if the SHTF.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 1, 2019, at 1:56 PM, Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA <teammel@...> wrote:

A couple of months ago I shared a presentation on Emergency Preparedness with the Spokane ARES group and the Inland Empire VHF clubs. My system is modular. As part of the system each October 1st I add to each vehicle my "Car Winter Go Bag."
The Contents are:
  • Sweatshirt
  • Pants
  • Socks
  • Shoes
  • Jacket (Fleece)
  • Jacket (wind and rain)
  • Gloves
  • Stocking Cap
  • Yellow emergency vest with reflector tape on it
  • Headlamp

I also add Car Tool Emergency bag in winter:
  • Shovel
  • Cat litter or Sand for traction
Whether you use a system like mine or not, you may want to think of adding a winter go bag to your cars.
I attached the handout I shared if you were interested. Miss all of you.

Mel
N7GCO
<Emergency Modules.docx>



Terry Beedle KG7LZO SK

Robin Amundson
 

Hi All,
Perhaps while I was gone the club noted Terry Beedle's passing on September 20. I just saw the notice in the October 17 Woodinville weekly.  A celebration of Terry's life will be held on Friday, November 1 at 1 p.m. at Carnation-Sno-Valley Senior Center, 4610 Stephens Ave, Carnation, WA.

Next to Terry's obituary with photo is Betty Rubin's obituary with photo. Betty was married for 71 years to my good buddy and elmer, Sam, WC7Q, who is 91 years young. 

73,
Robin, WA7CPA


Re: Shawn was right

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

Yes, thanks, Shawn, for seeing the need and doing the migration.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Oct 17, 2019, at 10:55 AM, Robin Amundson <wa7cpa@...> wrote:



Re: Echolink from Sarasota

Shawn / K7ATA
 

easier to install the echolink app on your phone and connect to our repeater directly, or find an irlp repeater and connect repeater<-->repeater

--Shawn
--K7ATA

On 10/17/2019 8:48 PM, Howard E. Mahran / WA1HEM wrote:
Great 7p discussion tonight about taking your radios with you while travelling. I'm headed to Florida this coming week and will be taking my Baofeng (BF-F8HP).

A real newbie question: if I find a Repeater that supports Echolink in Sarasota, can I use just my HT to contact our repeater to join next week's 7p and 8p checkins?


--
*************************
Howard E. Mahran
WA1HEM
(425) 864 - 5104
*************************


Echolink from Sarasota

Howard E. Mahran / WA1HEM
 

Great 7p discussion tonight about taking your radios with you while travelling. I'm headed to Florida this coming week and will be taking my Baofeng (BF-F8HP).

A real newbie question: if I find a Repeater that supports Echolink in Sarasota, can I use just my HT to contact our repeater to join next week's 7p and 8p checkins?


--
*************************
Howard E. Mahran
WA1HEM
(425) 864 - 5104
*************************


Re: Shawn was right

Rowland
 

Make sure everything has been moved from the Yahoo site.

 

Thanks,

 

Rowland

 

From: snovarc@groups.io <snovarc@groups.io> On Behalf Of Robin Amundson
Sent: Thursday, October 17, 2019 10:55 AM
To: snovarc@groups.io
Subject: [snovarc] Shawn was right

 

https://www.engadget.com/2019/10/16/yahoo-groups-to-shut-down/?fbclid=IwAR2oYh0egk31rpLvl0U3KkgJfJ_KFyU6zS_1EPWDzinAdi-We17w6WUJ098

Thank you Shawn for getting us migrated earlier.

73,
Robin, WA7CPA


Re: Jammer on Cougar Repeater

Rowland
 

Wonderful………….

 

Thanks,

 

Rowland

 

From: snovarc@groups.io <snovarc@groups.io> On Behalf Of W7ABD
Sent: Wednesday, October 16, 2019 6:46 PM
To: snovarc@groups.io
Subject: [snovarc] Jammer on Cougar Repeater

 

SnoVARC,

As of late we have been experiencing disruption of the club's repeater by an individual.  We refer to this type of person as a "jammer".

This Jammer typically disrupts the repeater between the hours 16:30 to 18:30 Monday through Friday.  These events last about 30 minutes or so and consist of rapid clicking of the mic PTT, broadcasting football games and playing music.  When I catch him at it, I turn the repeater off.  If you have noticed the repeater unresponsive in the evenings - this is why.

I believe this lowlife to be mobile, as I have heard him fade in and out on the reverse frequency (446.825) from my home QTH here east of Duvall.

Under FCC rules we as repeater owners are not libel for the content transmitted by others on our repeater.  We are libel though if we don't take action to stop these transmissions.  Hence the reason I have been turning the repeater off. 

If you have a chance, try listening to the input frequency of the repeater (446.825) during these times, to see if we can direction find these transmissions and locate this jammer.  Hopefully putting a stop to it.

Jim
W7ABD


Shawn was right

Robin Amundson
 


Re: Ixtapa Redmond Ridge SnoVARC holiday dinner confirmed Thurs 12/5 6 p.m.

Irvina Mizell
 

Count me in.

Irvina


From: snovarc@groups.io <snovarc@groups.io> on behalf of Robin Amundson <wa7cpa@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 16, 2019 3:52 PM
To: snovarc@groups.io <snovarc@groups.io>
Subject: [snovarc] Ixtapa Redmond Ridge SnoVARC holiday dinner confirmed Thurs 12/5 6 p.m.
 
Hi All,
Please use this thread to confirm your attendance at our annual holiday party and how many. The Ixtapa Redmond Ridge reservation is for 6 p.m. Ordering is off the menu, and separate checks, no pre-pay. I already have Kathy and Rowland and Lindy and Chuck confirmed. Thank you very much.

73,
Robin, WA7CPA


Re: Jammer on Cougar Repeater

Mark McClain
 

I have a lot of experience with tracking and catching jammers from 30+ years ago in So. Cal.  I've dealt with hams jamming other hams and repeaters, including law enforcement repeaters.  And I have had to deal with some minor occurrences here in the PNW over the last two decades with my repeaters 

The first thing to do is to establish a team, and use a non-public medium (ie- dont use this reflector or any other public or 'semi'-restricted forum.

I'll be happy to share additional info once someone determines how they want to communicate.

Mark McClain, N6OBY





Sent from my smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW) via Groups.Io" <louis.giliberto@...>
Date: 10/17/19 7:46 AM (GMT+01:00)
To: snovarc@groups.io
Subject: Re: [snovarc] Jammer on Cougar Repeater

I have a scanner with rssi logging and audio recording I'll turn on at my qth.


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 16, 2019, 6:46 PM, W7ABD < w7abd1@...> wrote:

SnoVARC,

As of late we have been experiencing disruption of the club's repeater by an individual.  We refer to this type of person as a "jammer".

This Jammer typically disrupts the repeater between the hours 16:30 to 18:30 Monday through Friday.  These events last about 30 minutes or so and consist of rapid clicking of the mic PTT, broadcasting football games and playing music.  When I catch him at it, I turn the repeater off.  If you have noticed the repeater unresponsive in the evenings - this is why.

I believe this lowlife to be mobile, as I have heard him fade in and out on the reverse frequency (446.825) from my home QTH here east of Duvall.

Under FCC rules we as repeater owners are not libel for the content transmitted by others on our repeater.  We are libel though if we don't take action to stop these transmissions.  Hence the reason I have been turning the repeater off. 

If you have a chance, try listening to the input frequency of the repeater (446.825) during these times, to see if we can direction find these transmissions and locate this jammer.  Hopefully putting a stop to it.

Jim
W7ABD


Re: Jammer on Cougar Repeater

Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW)
 

I have a scanner with rssi logging and audio recording I'll turn on at my qth.


Sent from ProtonMail mobile



-------- Original Message --------
On Oct 16, 2019, 6:46 PM, W7ABD < w7abd1@...> wrote:

SnoVARC,

As of late we have been experiencing disruption of the club's repeater by an individual.  We refer to this type of person as a "jammer".

This Jammer typically disrupts the repeater between the hours 16:30 to 18:30 Monday through Friday.  These events last about 30 minutes or so and consist of rapid clicking of the mic PTT, broadcasting football games and playing music.  When I catch him at it, I turn the repeater off.  If you have noticed the repeater unresponsive in the evenings - this is why.

I believe this lowlife to be mobile, as I have heard him fade in and out on the reverse frequency (446.825) from my home QTH here east of Duvall.

Under FCC rules we as repeater owners are not libel for the content transmitted by others on our repeater.  We are libel though if we don't take action to stop these transmissions.  Hence the reason I have been turning the repeater off. 

If you have a chance, try listening to the input frequency of the repeater (446.825) during these times, to see if we can direction find these transmissions and locate this jammer.  Hopefully putting a stop to it.

Jim
W7ABD