Date   

Re: If The Internet Went Down

Robin WA7CPA
 

This is why we need GO Boxes with radios. Not a reach. It is imaginable. We already lived without Internet, those of us old enough to remember.


If The Internet Went Down

Rowland
 

The following video about the internet going completely down is a bit of a reach but still food for thought.



Thanks,

Rowland


Re: Ham radio key to finding missing aircraft MH370

Paul Zoba, W7PEZ
 

This is very cool detective work using WSPR data. I’d like to understand how he did this better. Anyone find his call sign? 

Thanks Robin!

73,
Paul, W7PEZ 


On Feb 20, 2022, at 6:29 PM, Robin WA7CPA <wa7cpa@...> wrote:


International Radio Club reprints

Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW)
 

900+ articles from the International Radio Club are now available

https://swling.com/blog/2022/02/international-radio-clubs-reprints-collection-of-900-articles/


73
Lou

Sent from ProtonMail mobile



Ham radio key to finding missing aircraft MH370

Robin WA7CPA
 


Re: Car Accidents and Electrical Wires

Robin WA7CPA
 

Wow! Lifesaver!


On Sun, Feb 20, 2022, 3:29 PM Tom WA7TBP via groups.io <tomwa7tbp=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Rowland:
 
This is an excellent thing for all drivers and CERT's to look at. It was well done. Thanks for sharing.
 
Tom

In a message dated 2/19/2022 21:29:32 Pacific Standard Time, rowland.brasch@... writes:
 
I highly recommend watching this video on car accidents and power lines. If you remember, not to long ago, a local high school student was electrocuted when he stepped out of his car with power lines on it.


Re: Car Accidents and Electrical Wires

Tom WA7TBP
 

Rowland:
 
This is an excellent thing for all drivers and CERT's to look at. It was well done. Thanks for sharing.
 
Tom

In a message dated 2/19/2022 21:29:32 Pacific Standard Time, rowland.brasch@... writes:
 
I highly recommend watching this video on car accidents and power lines. If you remember, not to long ago, a local high school student was electrocuted when he stepped out of his car with power lines on it.


Car Accidents and Electrical Wires

Rowland
 

I highly recommend watching this video on car accidents and power lines. If you remember, not to long ago, a local high school student was electrocuted when he stepped out of his car with power lines on it.


Re: UV-5R SOTA in high levels of RF

Paul Zoba, W7PEZ
 

I’ve got 3 UV5s. I got the RT Systems for Baofeng and programmed them all up with my repeaters and all.  Ive stashed them in glove compartments of my wife and kids cars - for my use. My two vehicles have FTM400s installed and I have two FT5’s for if/when I leave the vehicle. Belt And Suspenders lol. It’s all fun!

73,
Paul, W7PEZ 


On Feb 19, 2022, at 3:27 PM, Dan Pflugrath <dpflugrath@...> wrote:

I have owned 4 UV-5R radios, gave away 2 still have 2 and also have an almost 10 watt TYT. which programs similar to the UV-5R.   All are still working well although the receivers in the UV-5Rs are not as sensitive as Yaesue's and Icom's.  The oldest I have lugged all over the mountains and other than the battery is downs .2 volts on a full charge is works like new.  The TYT I have has sensitivity close to that of the name brand radios and has been very reliability for SOTA. If you want to do SOTA with any handheld I recommend getting a half wave or 5/8 wave antenna over the 15 inch models.

As far as emergency communications I do not depend on them.  I carry a Zoleo PEB for emergencies which I highly recommend for all backwoods folks.  

73 Dan KA7GPP


Re: UV-5R SOTA in high levels of RF

Dan Pflugrath
 

I have owned 4 UV-5R radios, gave away 2 still have 2 and also have an almost 10 watt TYT. which programs similar to the UV-5R.   All are still working well although the receivers in the UV-5Rs are not as sensitive as Yaesue's and Icom's.  The oldest I have lugged all over the mountains and other than the battery is downs .2 volts on a full charge is works like new.  The TYT I have has sensitivity close to that of the name brand radios and has been very reliability for SOTA. If you want to do SOTA with any handheld I recommend getting a half wave or 5/8 wave antenna over the 15 inch models.

As far as emergency communications I do not depend on them.  I carry a Zoleo PEB for emergencies which I highly recommend for all backwoods folks.  

73 Dan KA7GPP


Re: UV-5R SOTA in high levels of RF

Jackson Beard
 

I've bricked four of those uv-5r radios in half a days use while hunting. I've only found one that still works. 

That pays for a decent FT60.

On Sat, Feb 19, 2022, 13:09 Ken Kosters <kenkosters@...> wrote:

I have two ft-60 and two UV-5r radios. When starting in radio the china radios did not exist but bang for the buck was ft-60 with diamond 77 antenna. Maybe $200 investment and made home brew antenna for sat work. Easy to field program, squelch dial, one button reverse, easy power changes. After I bought UV-5r just because I could program to transmit out of armature freq. for business at work. I tested after much satellite work with the FT-60 vs the UV-5r. Needless to say the new operator and or other operator would soon grow frustrated.

 

With that I would say with improved antenna the UV is ok radio yet frustrating for field programming or more complicated use for new operator.

 

Question is how many UV does one buy until “good” one is found of throw in the money for filters, antenna and other things in hopes it might work. Or just buy quality radio that most likely will work out of the box and even better with simple antenna improvement?

 

I consider the UV radios a disposable but when going into the woods they stay home and the FT-60 is in the pack.

 

My two cents.

 

Ken W7ECK 

 

 

From: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io [mailto:snovarc@snovarc.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul Butzi (W7PFB) via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2022 7:39 AM
To: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SnoVARC] UV-5R SOTA in high levels of RF

 

My cousin Curt K7ZOO is pretty active with SOTA in Arizona (among his other interesting projects is a plan to do summit to summit SOTA using heliographs).

 

His experience is that he is often able to hear stations on his Yaesu handheld that cannot be heard on SOTA partner's Baofeng UV-5r.  This is on summits that are in the middle of nowhere, so there are no other transmitters within miles.

 

Caveat: while it’s likely true that all FT-60’s perform alike, or that all Kenwood TH-F6a’s perform alike, it is most definitely not the case that all Baofeng UV-5r’s will perform alike, because of variations over time in which compromises are made for one particular batch of UV-5R radios.

 

An interesting article on building a bandpass filter is at https://www.arrl.org/files/file/Technology/Intermod/No_Tune_Filter.pdf

 

Note that both the filter described in the article and the SOTABEAMS filter have 3db of insertion loss, meaning that unless you get the filter out of your antenna feed when you transmit, the filter is eating half of the power and your 5 watt radio is effectively a 2.5W radio.

 

All very interesting stuff!

 

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!



On Feb 19, 2022, at 12:07 AM, Dan Pflugrath <dpflugrath@...> wrote:

 

Referencing Ken's (W7ECK) post and video about the Boafeng UV-5R handheld operating on summit with commercial RF transmitters and towers.

 

An easy way to check out your radio in a high RF environment is a drive up SOTA summit like Little Mountain W7W/SK-173  just south of Mt. Vernon.  I had the same RF overload experience there with my Baofeng UV-5R.  I generally do not have the problem with RF swamping my UV-5R by staying away from the antennas but still staying inside the activation zone.  It can even affect your HF operations.

For anyone that wants to operate "any" handheld radio in a high RF level environment (like Tiger Mtn. or Little Mtn.) you can purchase a 2 meter band pass filter from SOTABeams.  Even with the best Yasue, Kenwood etc radios the SOTA operators say the improvement is amazing with the bad pass filter.  All 2 meter radios are affected to some degree.   https://www.sotabeams.co.uk/bandpass-filter-for-2m/  I am not aware of anyone using this filter with a UV-5R.

 

If someone has one of these 2 meter band pass filters would you run some tests on a High level of RF  summit with various radios including the UV-5R to verify the performance with and without the filter.  Cougar mountain would also be a good place to run the tests but Little Mountain does not require a pass code access and Tiger is a good hike.

 

73 Dan KA7GPP

 

 


Re: UV-5R SOTA in high levels of RF

 

I have two ft-60 and two UV-5r radios. When starting in radio the china radios did not exist but bang for the buck was ft-60 with diamond 77 antenna. Maybe $200 investment and made home brew antenna for sat work. Easy to field program, squelch dial, one button reverse, easy power changes. After I bought UV-5r just because I could program to transmit out of armature freq. for business at work. I tested after much satellite work with the FT-60 vs the UV-5r. Needless to say the new operator and or other operator would soon grow frustrated.

 

With that I would say with improved antenna the UV is ok radio yet frustrating for field programming or more complicated use for new operator.

 

Question is how many UV does one buy until “good” one is found of throw in the money for filters, antenna and other things in hopes it might work. Or just buy quality radio that most likely will work out of the box and even better with simple antenna improvement?

 

I consider the UV radios a disposable but when going into the woods they stay home and the FT-60 is in the pack.

 

My two cents.

 

Ken W7ECK 

 

 

From: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io [mailto:snovarc@snovarc.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul Butzi (W7PFB) via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, February 19, 2022 7:39 AM
To: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SnoVARC] UV-5R SOTA in high levels of RF

 

My cousin Curt K7ZOO is pretty active with SOTA in Arizona (among his other interesting projects is a plan to do summit to summit SOTA using heliographs).

 

His experience is that he is often able to hear stations on his Yaesu handheld that cannot be heard on SOTA partner's Baofeng UV-5r.  This is on summits that are in the middle of nowhere, so there are no other transmitters within miles.

 

Caveat: while it’s likely true that all FT-60’s perform alike, or that all Kenwood TH-F6a’s perform alike, it is most definitely not the case that all Baofeng UV-5r’s will perform alike, because of variations over time in which compromises are made for one particular batch of UV-5R radios.

 

An interesting article on building a bandpass filter is at https://www.arrl.org/files/file/Technology/Intermod/No_Tune_Filter.pdf

 

Note that both the filter described in the article and the SOTABEAMS filter have 3db of insertion loss, meaning that unless you get the filter out of your antenna feed when you transmit, the filter is eating half of the power and your 5 watt radio is effectively a 2.5W radio.

 

All very interesting stuff!

 

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!



On Feb 19, 2022, at 12:07 AM, Dan Pflugrath <dpflugrath@...> wrote:

 

Referencing Ken's (W7ECK) post and video about the Boafeng UV-5R handheld operating on summit with commercial RF transmitters and towers.

 

An easy way to check out your radio in a high RF environment is a drive up SOTA summit like Little Mountain W7W/SK-173  just south of Mt. Vernon.  I had the same RF overload experience there with my Baofeng UV-5R.  I generally do not have the problem with RF swamping my UV-5R by staying away from the antennas but still staying inside the activation zone.  It can even affect your HF operations.

For anyone that wants to operate "any" handheld radio in a high RF level environment (like Tiger Mtn. or Little Mtn.) you can purchase a 2 meter band pass filter from SOTABeams.  Even with the best Yasue, Kenwood etc radios the SOTA operators say the improvement is amazing with the bad pass filter.  All 2 meter radios are affected to some degree.   https://www.sotabeams.co.uk/bandpass-filter-for-2m/  I am not aware of anyone using this filter with a UV-5R.

 

If someone has one of these 2 meter band pass filters would you run some tests on a High level of RF  summit with various radios including the UV-5R to verify the performance with and without the filter.  Cougar mountain would also be a good place to run the tests but Little Mountain does not require a pass code access and Tiger is a good hike.

 

73 Dan KA7GPP

 

 


Re: UV-5R SOTA in high levels of RF

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

My cousin Curt K7ZOO is pretty active with SOTA in Arizona (among his other interesting projects is a plan to do summit to summit SOTA using heliographs).

His experience is that he is often able to hear stations on his Yaesu handheld that cannot be heard on SOTA partner's Baofeng UV-5r.  This is on summits that are in the middle of nowhere, so there are no other transmitters within miles.

Caveat: while it’s likely true that all FT-60’s perform alike, or that all Kenwood TH-F6a’s perform alike, it is most definitely not the case that all Baofeng UV-5r’s will perform alike, because of variations over time in which compromises are made for one particular batch of UV-5R radios.

An interesting article on building a bandpass filter is at https://www.arrl.org/files/file/Technology/Intermod/No_Tune_Filter.pdf

Note that both the filter described in the article and the SOTABEAMS filter have 3db of insertion loss, meaning that unless you get the filter out of your antenna feed when you transmit, the filter is eating half of the power and your 5 watt radio is effectively a 2.5W radio.

All very interesting stuff!

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Feb 19, 2022, at 12:07 AM, Dan Pflugrath <dpflugrath@...> wrote:

Referencing Ken's (W7ECK) post and video about the Boafeng UV-5R handheld operating on summit with commercial RF transmitters and towers.
 
An easy way to check out your radio in a high RF environment is a drive up SOTA summit like Little Mountain W7W/SK-173  just south of Mt. Vernon.  I had the same RF overload experience there with my Baofeng UV-5R.  I generally do not have the problem with RF swamping my UV-5R by staying away from the antennas but still staying inside the activation zone.  It can even affect your HF operations.
For anyone that wants to operate "any" handheld radio in a high RF level environment (like Tiger Mtn. or Little Mtn.) you can purchase a 2 meter band pass filter from SOTABeams.  Even with the best Yasue, Kenwood etc radios the SOTA operators say the improvement is amazing with the bad pass filter.  All 2 meter radios are affected to some degree.   https://www.sotabeams.co.uk/bandpass-filter-for-2m/  I am not aware of anyone using this filter with a UV-5R.
 
If someone has one of these 2 meter band pass filters would you run some tests on a High level of RF  summit with various radios including the UV-5R to verify the performance with and without the filter.  Cougar mountain would also be a good place to run the tests but Little Mountain does not require a pass code access and Tiger is a good hike.
 
73 Dan KA7GPP
 


UV-5R SOTA in high levels of RF

Dan Pflugrath
 

Referencing Ken's (W7ECK) post and video about the Boafeng UV-5R handheld operating on summit with commercial RF transmitters and towers.

 

An easy way to check out your radio in a high RF environment is a drive up SOTA summit like Little Mountain W7W/SK-173  just south of Mt. Vernon.  I had the same RF overload experience there with my Baofeng UV-5R.  I generally do not have the problem with RF swamping my UV-5R by staying away from the antennas but still staying inside the activation zone.  It can even affect your HF operations.

For anyone that wants to operate "any" handheld radio in a high RF level environment (like Tiger Mtn. or Little Mtn.) you can purchase a 2 meter band pass filter from SOTABeams.  Even with the best Yasue, Kenwood etc radios the SOTA operators say the improvement is amazing with the bad pass filter.  All 2 meter radios are affected to some degree.   https://www.sotabeams.co.uk/bandpass-filter-for-2m/  I am not aware of anyone using this filter with a UV-5R.

 

If someone has one of these 2 meter band pass filters would you run some tests on a High level of RF  summit with various radios including the UV-5R to verify the performance with and without the filter.  Cougar mountain would also be a good place to run the tests but Little Mountain does not require a pass code access and Tiger is a good hike.

 

73 Dan KA7GPP

 


February 17, 2022 Third Thursday mini exercise

Tom WA7TBP
 

Hello everyone:
 
The third Thursday mini exercise will be a continuation of Dee Williamson's messaging presentation he provided for our January Elmer session.
 
After the check in net is completed, we will stay on the net frequency, Cougar Repeater, 441.825 MHz, plus 5 MHz shift, 103.5 Hz tone. I will pass three messages, one at a time, for all participants to copy. After each message, I will ask you a question or two about some point in the message. I will then read the message back to you so you may check your copying accuracy. You will not need to read the message back to me. Our main points are to practice copying a message, confirming how many words are in the message, and filling out the header (top part of the message form). I have attached two ARRL message forms for you, but you will need to make extra copies for your third message, or to cover any mistakes you made while copying the message. 
 
If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to e-mail or call, 425-333-4833.
 
Looking forward to hearing you on Thursday.
 
Tom


Baofeng UV-5R Easy Manual

Rowland
 

I came across this nice manual that takes a relaxed approach to the UV-5R HT.  For those that are new to the radio it will be great.  For those that are familiar with the HT you might find it a little too basic.  Either way it is another informative version.  I have attached it to this email and will also put it in the files section of the SnoVARC io site.


Thanks,

Rowland


DAPNET - Party like it's 1999

Lou Giliberto (KD7HCW)
 


What is it?  POCSAG Paging.  Remember those pager things from the 90's?  Yup, hams can refurbish them to an amateur frequency or buy a new one where one can set the frequency in setup.  I did the latter; the "standard" is a 70cm frequency.

The easy way to play with this is to use a hotspot - both OpenSpot and Pi-Star support POCSAG.  You register your pager and transmitter with the guys at hampager, and then you can receive pages.  Since it's a one-way transmission, the usual one-way FCC rules apply: test messages, radio news, emergencies, telemetry, etc.

One cool thing is the robustness.  A 45w 70cm transmitter could cover a large area, and if the backhaul (i.e., internet) stays up at the transmitter place, it can cover a pretty wide area with a strong signal for less money than a portable cell tower to send SMS.  In the US most people are just using a hotspot, but in Europe, especially Germany, they have some full power (30-50w) transmitters doing this.

Obviously, it's not the highest priority use of our radio budgets.  It has emergency scenario uses, but 99% of the time it's a fringe interest. A modern pager that "just works" is like $80+ and then at least a hotspot is needed to use some 1990's tech to get a primitive version of an SMS message, lol.

But like a lot of things in ham radio, we do it "because we can" not "because it's useful" so I thought I would share with the club.  I have it up and running, so if anyone decides to play with this and needs help, please feel free to give me a yell.

73,
Lou  KD7HCW

Sent with ProtonMail Secure Email.


locked Re: DHS Issues National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin

Kirt White / K7KDW
 

* Topic Locked

As ham radio operators, especially with the amount of us who are into emergency preparedness, it is wise to be aware of pending legislation and/or actions from government agencies that may have an impact on these activities. 

This is how I interpreted the original informational post. 

Opinions on the legitimacy off these actions are another discussion. I'm sure there are quite a few folks on here, including myself, that welcome civil political discourse surrounding a range of topics. Unfortunately, these discussions can veer off topic and quickly devolve which makes the main group less than ideal for these types of discussions.

Due to this, as well as some offline traction, this topic has been locked. 

Please feel free to reach out to me directly for questions. 

Thanks
Kirt


locked Re: DHS Issues National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin

Jackson Beard
 

It doesn't take very long at all for an organization that is created to protect us from external threats becomes an organization that watches us.



On Mon, Feb 7, 2022 at 12:51 PM Rowland <rowland.brasch@...> wrote:

FYI ONLY


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: U.S. Department of Homeland Security <departmentofhomelandsecurity@...>
Date: Mon, Feb 7, 2022 at 11:03 AM
Subject: DHS Issues National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin
To: <rowland.brasch@...>


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Office of Public Affairs


DHS Issues National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin

WASHINGTON – Today, Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas issued a National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin regarding the continued heightened threat environment across the United States. This is the fifth NTAS Bulletin issued by the Department of Homeland Security since January 2021 and it replaces the current Bulletin that was set to expire tomorrow. 

  

“DHS remains committed to proactively sharing timely information and intelligence about the evolving threat environment with the American public,” said Secretary Alejandro N. Mayorkas. “We also remain committed to working with our partners across every level of government and in the private sector to prevent all forms of terrorism and targeted violence, and to support law enforcement efforts to keep our communities safe. This NTAS Bulletin outlines the key factors that have increased the volatility, unpredictability, and complexity of the current threat environment, and highlights resources for individuals and communities to stay safe.”   

  

The United States remains in a heightened threat environment fueled by several factors, including an online environment filled with false or misleading narratives and conspiracy theories, and other forms of mis- dis- and mal-information (MDM) introduced and/or amplified by foreign and domestic threat actors. These threat actors seek to exacerbate societal friction to sow discord and undermine public trust in government institutions to encourage unrest, which could potentially inspire acts of violence. Mass casualty attacks and other acts of targeted violence conducted by lone offenders and small groups acting in furtherance of ideological beliefs and/or personal grievances pose an ongoing threat to the nation.   

  

While the conditions underlying the heightened threat landscape have not significantly changed over the last year, the convergence of the following factors has increased the volatility, unpredictability, and complexity of the threat environment: (1) the proliferation of false or misleading narratives, which sow discord or undermine public trust in U.S. government institutions; (2) continued calls for violence directed at U.S. critical infrastructure; soft targets and mass gatherings; faith-based institutions, such as churches, synagogues, and mosques; institutions of higher education; racial and religious minorities; government facilities and personnel, including law enforcement and the military; the media; and perceived ideological opponents; and (3) calls by foreign terrorist organizations for attacks on the United States based on recent events.   

  

DHS and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) continue to share timely and actionable information and intelligence with the broadest audience possible. This includes sharing information and intelligence with our partners across every level of government and in the private sector. Under the Biden-Harris Administration, DHS is prioritizing combating all forms of terrorism and targeted violence, including through its efforts to support the first-ever National Strategy for Countering Domestic Terrorism. Since January 2021, DHS has taken several steps in this regard, including:

  • established a new domestic terrorism branch within DHS’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis dedicated to producing sound, timely intelligence needed to counter domestic terrorism-related threats;
  • launched the Center for Prevention Programs and Partnerships (CP3) to provide communities with resources and tools to help prevent individuals from radicalizing to violence;
  • designated domestic violent extremism as a “National Priority Area” within DHS’s Homeland Security Grant Program for the first time, resulting in at least $77 million being spent on preventing, preparing for, protecting against, and responding to related threats nationwide;
  • provided $180 million in funding to support target hardening and other physical security enhancements to non-profit organizations at high risk of terrorist attack through DHS’s Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP);
  • increased efforts to identify and evaluate MDM, including false or misleading narratives and conspiracy theories spread on social media and other online platforms, that endorse violence; and,
  • enhanced collaboration with public and private sector partners – including U.S. critical infrastructure owners and operators – to better protect our cyber and physical infrastructure and increase the Nation’s cybersecurity through the Department’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA).

DHS also has renewed its commitment to ensure that all efforts to combat domestic violent extremism are conducted in ways consistent with privacy protections, civil rights and civil liberties, and all applicable laws. 

 

This NTAS Bulletin will expire on June 7, 2022. This NTAS Bulletin provides the public with information about the threat landscape facing the United States, how to stay safe, and resources and tools to help prevent an individual’s radicalization to violence. The public should report any suspicious activity or threats of violence to local law enforcement, FBI Field Offices, or a local Fusion Center.  Read the current NTAS Bulletin here. 

 


This email was sent to rowland.brasch@... on behalf of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security | DHS.gov

--
Thanks,
Rowland



--
Jackson Beard III
macleanofduart@...


locked DHS Issues National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin

Rowland
 


FYI ONLY


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: U.S. Department of Homeland Security <departmentofhomelandsecurity@...>
Date: Mon, Feb 7, 2022 at 11:03 AM
Subject: DHS Issues National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin
To: <rowland.brasch@...>


U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Office of Public Affairs


DHS Issues National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin

WASHINGTON – Today, Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro N. Mayorkas issued a National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin regarding the continued heightened threat environment across the United States. This is the fifth NTAS Bulletin issued by the Department of Homeland Security since January 2021 and it replaces the current Bulletin that was set to expire tomorrow. 

  

“DHS remains committed to proactively sharing timely information and intelligence about the evolving threat environment with the American public,” said Secretary Alejandro N. Mayorkas. “We also remain committed to working with our partners across every level of government and in the private sector to prevent all forms of terrorism and targeted violence, and to support law enforcement efforts to keep our communities safe. This NTAS Bulletin outlines the key factors that have increased the volatility, unpredictability, and complexity of the current threat environment, and highlights resources for individuals and communities to stay safe.”   

  

The United States remains in a heightened threat environment fueled by several factors, including an online environment filled with false or misleading narratives and conspiracy theories, and other forms of mis- dis- and mal-information (MDM) introduced and/or amplified by foreign and domestic threat actors. These threat actors seek to exacerbate societal friction to sow discord and undermine public trust in government institutions to encourage unrest, which could potentially inspire acts of violence. Mass casualty attacks and other acts of targeted violence conducted by lone offenders and small groups acting in furtherance of ideological beliefs and/or personal grievances pose an ongoing threat to the nation.   

  

While the conditions underlying the heightened threat landscape have not significantly changed over the last year, the convergence of the following factors has increased the volatility, unpredictability, and complexity of the threat environment: (1) the proliferation of false or misleading narratives, which sow discord or undermine public trust in U.S. government institutions; (2) continued calls for violence directed at U.S. critical infrastructure; soft targets and mass gatherings; faith-based institutions, such as churches, synagogues, and mosques; institutions of higher education; racial and religious minorities; government facilities and personnel, including law enforcement and the military; the media; and perceived ideological opponents; and (3) calls by foreign terrorist organizations for attacks on the United States based on recent events.   

  

DHS and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) continue to share timely and actionable information and intelligence with the broadest audience possible. This includes sharing information and intelligence with our partners across every level of government and in the private sector. Under the Biden-Harris Administration, DHS is prioritizing combating all forms of terrorism and targeted violence, including through its efforts to support the first-ever National Strategy for Countering Domestic Terrorism. Since January 2021, DHS has taken several steps in this regard, including:

  • established a new domestic terrorism branch within DHS’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis dedicated to producing sound, timely intelligence needed to counter domestic terrorism-related threats;
  • launched the Center for Prevention Programs and Partnerships (CP3) to provide communities with resources and tools to help prevent individuals from radicalizing to violence;
  • designated domestic violent extremism as a “National Priority Area” within DHS’s Homeland Security Grant Program for the first time, resulting in at least $77 million being spent on preventing, preparing for, protecting against, and responding to related threats nationwide;
  • provided $180 million in funding to support target hardening and other physical security enhancements to non-profit organizations at high risk of terrorist attack through DHS’s Nonprofit Security Grant Program (NSGP);
  • increased efforts to identify and evaluate MDM, including false or misleading narratives and conspiracy theories spread on social media and other online platforms, that endorse violence; and,
  • enhanced collaboration with public and private sector partners – including U.S. critical infrastructure owners and operators – to better protect our cyber and physical infrastructure and increase the Nation’s cybersecurity through the Department’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA).

DHS also has renewed its commitment to ensure that all efforts to combat domestic violent extremism are conducted in ways consistent with privacy protections, civil rights and civil liberties, and all applicable laws. 

 

This NTAS Bulletin will expire on June 7, 2022. This NTAS Bulletin provides the public with information about the threat landscape facing the United States, how to stay safe, and resources and tools to help prevent an individual’s radicalization to violence. The public should report any suspicious activity or threats of violence to local law enforcement, FBI Field Offices, or a local Fusion Center.  Read the current NTAS Bulletin here. 

 


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