Date   

Re: Tarheel questions

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

Howard, the antenna mounts on a 3/8-24 thread.  So any place on the Jeep where you could mount such a threaded stud, you could mount (and ground) the antenna.  Heck, you could put a stud on a plate held by suction cups and stick the suction cups to the jeep, and then just run a grounding wire to some place on the Jeep frame.  But you probably wouldn’t want the Jeep in motion with such a setup.

CB antennas commonly mount on 3/8-24 studs, so any CB antenna mount would seem to be a solution.  Looking on Amazon I see a variety of mounts for Jeeps - some that go under the spare tire mount, some seem to attach to things which I guess Jeeps have and about which I know nothing.

Out of curiosity, how do you mount the VHF/UHF antenna on the Jeep currently?  You could always pop the VHF/UHF antenna off that NMO mount and screw an NMO to 3/8 adapter, and away you go.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jun 5, 2020, at 12:43 PM, Howard E. Mahran / WA1HEM <wa1hem@...> wrote:

I agree that this is a great conversation.

I was thinking about the Tarheel II but given that this unit needs to be mounted on the body causes an kerfuffle for my aluminum-bodied Jeep. Am I right to think that I would need to go to a trailer-Hitch mount and use one of the larger Tarheel antennas to use with the Jeep?

Also, can these be used "in the field" without the vehicle as a ground plane? What would need to be done to create a decent ground plane, let say in my backyard or up in the hills somewhere?

Thanks - I definitely see my wallet getting thinner as this conversation progresses :-) 

Howard
--
*************************
Howard E. Mahran
WA1HEM
(425) 864 - 5104
*************************


Re: Tarheel questions

Howard E. Mahran / WA1HEM
 
Edited

I agree that this is a great conversation.

I was thinking about the Tarheel II but given that this unit needs to be mounted on the body causes a kerfuffle for my aluminum-bodied Jeep. Am I right to think that I would need to go to a trailer-Hitch mount and use one of the larger Tarheel antennas to use with the Jeep?

Also, can these be used "in the field" without the vehicle as a ground plane? What would need to be done to create a decent ground plane, let say in my backyard or up in the hills somewhere?

Thanks - I definitely see my wallet getting thinner as this conversation progresses :-) 

Howard
--
*************************
Howard E. Mahran
WA1HEM
(425) 864 - 5104
*************************


Re: Tarheel questions

W7ABD
 

A few things to consider...

The size of the tarheel antenna coil depends on where you plan to mount the antenna on your vehicle.  The bigger coils need to mounted to the frame or the lowest part of the body.  The smaller coils need to be mounted on top of the vehicle.

Getting longer whips is not a bad idea, nor is getting the capacitance hat.  As you discovered, it does effect the range of the coverage.  But the whips are easy to change in the field, so that's not a big deal.

If your planning on using a mag mount, you only need the single magnet if you plan on only using it for mobile in place (vehicle stationary).  Get the NMO type mag mount with a NMO to 3/8 x 26 adapter.

You will need a good controller for your antenna.  The basic antenna unit only comes with a rocker switch.  I purchased the Ameritron SDC 102 Controller for my antenna.  Check out the "controllers" tab on the tarheel web page to see what's available.

Pay close attention to the instructions when setting up your controller for the first time.  The smaller coil antennas have lower maximum current cut-off's than the bigger coils.


Jim
W7ABD


On 6/5/20 08:46, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) wrote:
Great meeting last night, I particularly enjoyed the field day plan discussions and the discussion about Tarheel antennas.

But looking at the Tarheel website this morning I am dazzled by the array of choices.  And now I have a lot of questions and I’m hoping the Tarheel owners will put me on the straight and narrow path to Tarheel satisfaction.

I see there are some models which differ from other models by offering power handling up to 1.5KW.  I have no interest in running more than 100 watts when operating in the field, so I can exclude: Model 40, Model 100, Model 200.  (assuming there are no other reasons to pick those over the lower power equivalents).

It appears to me things boil down to two issues: coil length and whip length.  It seems to me a longer whip is to be preferred unless you want to operate while moving (I don’t plan that at this time).  Longer whip would mean higher radiation resistance so I’m guessing I want the 72” long whip, not the 32 or 36” whip.  So that rules out models: Baby, Little, Little II, am I correct?

But wait!  The models with the shorter whip cover up thru 54MHz, so they cover up thru 6m.  And the models with the longer whip cover up thru 26, 28, 30MHz, so they cover only up thru either 12m or 10m.  And I can imagine 10m and 6m being useful.  So now the shorter whip lengths suddenly look appealing.

And of course Model 300 and 400 go as low as 1.7/1.6 MHz, so they cover 160m as well.  And I currently have no antenna that will cover 160m!

What is a ham to do?

Let’s assume I’m going to follow along behind Robin, and use a big big mag mount on the roof of my car, operating only when stationary. Covering 40m and 20m is essential.  Covering 80m would be nice but probably of less value to me, as most of what I see doing is during the times when 80m is not really the best choice.  Covering 17m-10m would be handy, and I’m wondering about the 6m option.  (on the 6m thing I suspect a good option would be to just put a tuned 1/4 wave vertical on the mount and use the car as a ground plane would work well, so maybe I don’t need the Tarheel to cover 6m?)

A little guidance on this choice would be a big help.


-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!






Tarheel questions

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

Great meeting last night, I particularly enjoyed the field day plan discussions and the discussion about Tarheel antennas.

But looking at the Tarheel website this morning I am dazzled by the array of choices. And now I have a lot of questions and I’m hoping the Tarheel owners will put me on the straight and narrow path to Tarheel satisfaction.

I see there are some models which differ from other models by offering power handling up to 1.5KW. I have no interest in running more than 100 watts when operating in the field, so I can exclude: Model 40, Model 100, Model 200. (assuming there are no other reasons to pick those over the lower power equivalents).

It appears to me things boil down to two issues: coil length and whip length. It seems to me a longer whip is to be preferred unless you want to operate while moving (I don’t plan that at this time). Longer whip would mean higher radiation resistance so I’m guessing I want the 72” long whip, not the 32 or 36” whip. So that rules out models: Baby, Little, Little II, am I correct?

But wait! The models with the shorter whip cover up thru 54MHz, so they cover up thru 6m. And the models with the longer whip cover up thru 26, 28, 30MHz, so they cover only up thru either 12m or 10m. And I can imagine 10m and 6m being useful. So now the shorter whip lengths suddenly look appealing.

And of course Model 300 and 400 go as low as 1.7/1.6 MHz, so they cover 160m as well. And I currently have no antenna that will cover 160m!

What is a ham to do?

Let’s assume I’m going to follow along behind Robin, and use a big big mag mount on the roof of my car, operating only when stationary. Covering 40m and 20m is essential. Covering 80m would be nice but probably of less value to me, as most of what I see doing is during the times when 80m is not really the best choice. Covering 17m-10m would be handy, and I’m wondering about the 6m option. (on the 6m thing I suspect a good option would be to just put a tuned 1/4 wave vertical on the mount and use the car as a ground plane would work well, so maybe I don’t need the Tarheel to cover 6m?)

A little guidance on this choice would be a big help.


-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!


Re: Link to tonight's meeting please

Kirt White / K7KDW
 

The zoom link will still work since as long as the meeting ID and password doesn't change. The message is confusing


From: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io <snovarc@snovarc.groups.io> on behalf of Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2020 6:15 PM
To: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io <snovarc@snovarc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SnoVARC] Link to tonight's meeting please
 
Ok, yeah, I’m with Irvina.  How do I connect to this meeting?

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jun 4, 2020, at 5:32 PM, Irvina Mizell <irvina.mizell@...> wrote:

and thanks.

Irvina



Re: Link to tonight's meeting please

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

Ok, yeah, I’m with Irvina.  How do I connect to this meeting?

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jun 4, 2020, at 5:32 PM, Irvina Mizell <irvina.mizell@...> wrote:

and thanks.

Irvina



Re: Link to tonight's meeting please

Ralph Lease
 

The attached link is for 5-7 not tonights meeting.


On Thu, Jun 4, 2020 at 5:57 PM Kirt White / K7KDW <kirtwhite@...> wrote:


From: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io <snovarc@snovarc.groups.io> on behalf of Irvina Mizell <irvina.mizell@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2020 5:32 PM
To: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io <snovarc@snovarc.groups.io>
Subject: [SnoVARC] Link to tonight's meeting please
 
and thanks.

Irvina


Re: Link to tonight's meeting please

Kirt White / K7KDW
 


From: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io <snovarc@snovarc.groups.io> on behalf of Irvina Mizell <irvina.mizell@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2020 5:32 PM
To: snovarc@snovarc.groups.io <snovarc@snovarc.groups.io>
Subject: [SnoVARC] Link to tonight's meeting please
 
and thanks.

Irvina


Link to tonight's meeting please

Irvina Mizell
 

and thanks.

Irvina


Re: Interference

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

I’ve been monitoring.

I have two separate reports:

1.  At one point while I was mobile between Redmond and Fall City, I got what sounded like DMR or DSTAR, moderate signal strength.

2.  In Carnation, HEAVY interference on 146.5, but it sounded like very loud static, with no modulation.  The interference stretched from 146.450 or so all the way up past 146.550, strongest at 146.51 or so.  As I drove from Carnation to my place, the strength of that interference faded.  I get about two bars at my house.

If someone could take a look at a panadapter when they hear the interference, well, it would be mighty nice to know how wide the different signals I heard are.

If it’s DMR or DSTAR then the bandwidth occupied is going to be narrow.  What I heard entering Carnation was really, really wide - 100KHz at least.  Or at least I could pick it up on my Kenwood D710G across a range that wide.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jun 1, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Rowland <rowland.brasch@...> wrote:

When I monitored the noise on 146.500 it hit me at S9 plus and was very loud.


Thanks,

Rowland



On Mon, Jun 1, 2020 at 5:24 PM Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...> wrote:
146.500 is in the VNDB repeater output allocation in the WWARA plan.  I was pretty sure there was a DMR repeater there so I looked and sure enough, there’s a DMR repeater listed in the coordinated plan, callsign AF7PR.  

If it’s doing CW ID, just knowing whether it’s IDing as AF7PR would give us a big clue.  I think the repeater is supposed to be way the heck up near Bellingham, which seems like a long shot to the Sno Valley.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jun 1, 2020, at 5:11 PM, Tom WA7TBP via groups.io <tomwa7tbp@...> wrote:

Hello all:

I would like to point out that on 146.500 MHz, there is a strong digital signal. I believe it could be a digital paging signal. It is intermittent, but sometimes can last for several minutes. I have heard a Morse code ID once in awhile, but have not been in a position to copy the code. Please take a listen and see if you hear the signal. Rowland and I have both heard it. If you can get any information about this signal, let me know and I will do what I can to get some time of action started to rectify the situation.

Thank you in advance for taking a listen.

73,

Tom, WA7TBP





Re: Interference

Rowland
 

When I monitored the noise on 146.500 it hit me at S9 plus and was very loud.


Thanks,

Rowland



On Mon, Jun 1, 2020 at 5:24 PM Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...> wrote:
146.500 is in the VNDB repeater output allocation in the WWARA plan.  I was pretty sure there was a DMR repeater there so I looked and sure enough, there’s a DMR repeater listed in the coordinated plan, callsign AF7PR.  

If it’s doing CW ID, just knowing whether it’s IDing as AF7PR would give us a big clue.  I think the repeater is supposed to be way the heck up near Bellingham, which seems like a long shot to the Sno Valley.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jun 1, 2020, at 5:11 PM, Tom WA7TBP via groups.io <tomwa7tbp@...> wrote:

Hello all:

I would like to point out that on 146.500 MHz, there is a strong digital signal. I believe it could be a digital paging signal. It is intermittent, but sometimes can last for several minutes. I have heard a Morse code ID once in awhile, but have not been in a position to copy the code. Please take a listen and see if you hear the signal. Rowland and I have both heard it. If you can get any information about this signal, let me know and I will do what I can to get some time of action started to rectify the situation.

Thank you in advance for taking a listen.

73,

Tom, WA7TBP


Re: Interference

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

146.500 is in the VNDB repeater output allocation in the WWARA plan.  I was pretty sure there was a DMR repeater there so I looked and sure enough, there’s a DMR repeater listed in the coordinated plan, callsign AF7PR.  

If it’s doing CW ID, just knowing whether it’s IDing as AF7PR would give us a big clue.  I think the repeater is supposed to be way the heck up near Bellingham, which seems like a long shot to the Sno Valley.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jun 1, 2020, at 5:11 PM, Tom WA7TBP via groups.io <tomwa7tbp@...> wrote:

Hello all:

I would like to point out that on 146.500 MHz, there is a strong digital signal. I believe it could be a digital paging signal. It is intermittent, but sometimes can last for several minutes. I have heard a Morse code ID once in awhile, but have not been in a position to copy the code. Please take a listen and see if you hear the signal. Rowland and I have both heard it. If you can get any information about this signal, let me know and I will do what I can to get some time of action started to rectify the situation.

Thank you in advance for taking a listen.

73,

Tom, WA7TBP


Interference

Tom WA7TBP
 

Hello all:

I would like to point out that on 146.500 MHz, there is a strong digital signal. I believe it could be a digital paging signal. It is intermittent, but sometimes can last for several minutes. I have heard a Morse code ID once in awhile, but have not been in a position to copy the code. Please take a listen and see if you hear the signal. Rowland and I have both heard it. If you can get any information about this signal, let me know and I will do what I can to get some time of action started to rectify the situation.

Thank you in advance for taking a listen.

73,

Tom, WA7TBP


Re: hanging antenna lines with a drone

Paul Zoba
 

My current antenna is a Comet GP6 and it is only about 30’ high in that same tree.  I do need longer coax... maybe 150’? I have been thinking about upgrading to a Comet GP9. Maybe now is the time.  My altitude is 500’. If I could get the antenna 100’ up that would be amazing!

I have sent the following questions to Comet Tech Support about their radials...
If a radial got bent downwards, how much would this impact performance? And if the radials were replaced with equal length of say, 14 gauge wire, to hang down like a Tiger Tail, how much would this impact performance?

73,
Paul 
W7PEZ


On Jun 1, 2020, at 1:54 PM, Howard E. Mahran / WA1HEM <wa1hem@...> wrote:

That is awesome! What antenna are you going to hang?

On Jun 1, 2020, at 1:26 PM, Paul Zoba <pezoba@...> wrote:

Butzi Air Services was a success!



Paul graciously came to my home and placed a line over a Douglas Fir next to my driveway. I believe he said the tree is 123’ tall. We managed to get the line right over the top. I’m going to need longer coax!

Paul, thank you again! I appreciate the help. And I will be happy to assist with line installs for anyone else.

73,

Paul
W7PEZ
On May 29, 2020, at 1:16 PM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...> wrote:

A number of folks have been eagerly awaiting a progress report on my efforts to hang antenna support lines using a drone.

This afternoon I successfully put a rope in an excellent placement over a 85 foot tall Douglas Fir.

Equipment is:
* DJI Mavic Pro Platinum drone
* dronefishing.com payload release
* drop weight consisting of a tennis ball with 200 grams of pennies inside and a wire loop threaded through the ball.
* Teflon coated Spectra fishing line
* bright orange nylon twine

Process:

One end of a 1.5m long length of fishing line has a loop that is captured and then release by the payload release.  The other end is attached to the tennis ball.  The fishing line to be place over the tree is tied to the tennis ball as well.

Step 1:
fire up the drone and lift off, hover at about 6 feet.  With the drone hovering, place the loop in the line that goes to the tennis ball into the payload release and close the release, so that the tennis ball is now on the ground, a short line runs up to the payload release.  The fishing line to go over the tree goes to the spool held by your Trusty Assistant.

Step 2:
fly the drone up and on to the approach path to the tree you want the line to go over.  With the camera horizontal, fly up until the highest part of the target tree is now below the horizon on the camera, and note the altitude.  Ascend another 10-15 feet so you are sure the tennis ball will clear the tree as you fly over.  While you ascend your Trusty Assistant is letting the line pay out and keeping it from tangling in everything including the line itself.

Step 3: fly over the tree, taking care to pick a path that will place the fishing line trailing behind the tennis ball over the limb you want.  It helps if at this point the camera is pointed directly down.

Step 4: once the drone has passed over the tree and you’re directly above the spot you want the weight to hit when it’s dropped, make sure the target area is free of people, kittens, puppies, and other items of value.  If it’s clear, hit the button to release the tennis ball, and watch in rapt admiration as the ball drops neatly onto the exact spot you had selected.  it’s best to give Trusty Assistant a heads up just before you hit the release, so they can be prepared to let the line spool out freely as the ball drops.

Step 5:
Fly the drone back to a safe landing area, being careful to not hit the tree you just placed the line over.  Land the drone.

Step 6:
Go find the tennis ball, which will be surprisingly close to where it hit the ground.  Tie the bright orange nylon line to the fishing line loop, then detach the fishing line from the tennis ball.  Now go back, grab the other end of the fishing line, and have Trusty Assistant pay out the orange nylon twine as you reel in the fishing line, pulling the nylon twine over the tree.  At this point you’ll be able to spot the twine as it goes over the tree and you can assess how well it’s placed.

Step 7: once you have the nylon twine over the tree you can detach the fishing line from it, and bend on the rope you want as the final suspension rope.  Then you can go back to the other side, and use the nylon twine to pull the rope over.  Make sure the ends of the final rope cannot be lost or pulled up out of reach.

You’re done.  Next step is use the rope to hang your antenna.

Some observations:
* a light breeze doesn’t interfere with flying the drone but will affect how the fishing line hangs as you fly over the tree.  Doing all this during a still period would be a good plan.
* it’s far, far easier to put the line where you want it using a drone than it is doing it will an air cannon.  Much, much easier.
* With an air cannon it’s often a trick to find a good place to stand when you fire the shot, as often there are inconveniently placed objects line houses, trees, etc. in the way.  You don’t have that problem with the drone.
* if you don’t have a good takeoff/landing area for the drone, and a clear flight path to get the line over the tree, you would be stuck.
* the tree I put the ilne over was about 85 feet tall.  I put the line over a branch that is right at the top, a placement that’s hard to achieve with an air cannon.  The same quality placement could be done without increased difficulty and trees 150-200 feet high.  The altitude simply makes no difference.

Having worked out how to do all this I’d like to spread the knowledge far and wide and I’d like to get some practice by putting up lines for anyone who might want it done.  If you want lines put up, or know someone who does, contact me or pass on my contact info as appropriate.


-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!







<image0.jpeg>


***********************************
Howard Mahran
(425) 864-5104
***********************************





--
*************************
Howard E. Mahran
WA1HEM
(425) 864 - 5104
*************************


Re: hanging antenna lines with a drone

Paul Butzi (W7PFB)
 

It took us two tries to get it done. Under two unhurried hours all told, including one drone flight to assess what the top of the tree looked like and what the angles were going to be. The first attempt went astray because we didn’t really understand how to deal with the breeze drifting the line sideways.

Foolishly I did not shoot video while doing it. But I do have video of hanging a line here at my place.

-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!

On Jun 1, 2020, at 1:26 PM, Paul Zoba <pezoba@...> wrote:

Butzi Air Services was a success!



Paul graciously came to my home and placed a line over a Douglas Fir next to my driveway. I believe he said the tree is 123’ tall. We managed to get the line right over the top. I’m going to need longer coax!

Paul, thank you again! I appreciate the help. And I will be happy to assist with line installs for anyone else.

73,

Paul
W7PEZ
On May 29, 2020, at 1:16 PM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...> wrote:

A number of folks have been eagerly awaiting a progress report on my efforts to hang antenna support lines using a drone.

This afternoon I successfully put a rope in an excellent placement over a 85 foot tall Douglas Fir.

Equipment is:
* DJI Mavic Pro Platinum drone
* dronefishing.com payload release
* drop weight consisting of a tennis ball with 200 grams of pennies inside and a wire loop threaded through the ball.
* Teflon coated Spectra fishing line
* bright orange nylon twine

Process:

One end of a 1.5m long length of fishing line has a loop that is captured and then release by the payload release. The other end is attached to the tennis ball. The fishing line to be place over the tree is tied to the tennis ball as well.

Step 1:
fire up the drone and lift off, hover at about 6 feet. With the drone hovering, place the loop in the line that goes to the tennis ball into the payload release and close the release, so that the tennis ball is now on the ground, a short line runs up to the payload release. The fishing line to go over the tree goes to the spool held by your Trusty Assistant.

Step 2:
fly the drone up and on to the approach path to the tree you want the line to go over. With the camera horizontal, fly up until the highest part of the target tree is now below the horizon on the camera, and note the altitude. Ascend another 10-15 feet so you are sure the tennis ball will clear the tree as you fly over. While you ascend your Trusty Assistant is letting the line pay out and keeping it from tangling in everything including the line itself.

Step 3: fly over the tree, taking care to pick a path that will place the fishing line trailing behind the tennis ball over the limb you want. It helps if at this point the camera is pointed directly down.

Step 4: once the drone has passed over the tree and you’re directly above the spot you want the weight to hit when it’s dropped, make sure the target area is free of people, kittens, puppies, and other items of value. If it’s clear, hit the button to release the tennis ball, and watch in rapt admiration as the ball drops neatly onto the exact spot you had selected. it’s best to give Trusty Assistant a heads up just before you hit the release, so they can be prepared to let the line spool out freely as the ball drops.

Step 5:
Fly the drone back to a safe landing area, being careful to not hit the tree you just placed the line over. Land the drone.

Step 6:
Go find the tennis ball, which will be surprisingly close to where it hit the ground. Tie the bright orange nylon line to the fishing line loop, then detach the fishing line from the tennis ball. Now go back, grab the other end of the fishing line, and have Trusty Assistant pay out the orange nylon twine as you reel in the fishing line, pulling the nylon twine over the tree. At this point you’ll be able to spot the twine as it goes over the tree and you can assess how well it’s placed.

Step 7: once you have the nylon twine over the tree you can detach the fishing line from it, and bend on the rope you want as the final suspension rope. Then you can go back to the other side, and use the nylon twine to pull the rope over. Make sure the ends of the final rope cannot be lost or pulled up out of reach.

You’re done. Next step is use the rope to hang your antenna.

Some observations:
* a light breeze doesn’t interfere with flying the drone but will affect how the fishing line hangs as you fly over the tree. Doing all this during a still period would be a good plan.
* it’s far, far easier to put the line where you want it using a drone than it is doing it will an air cannon. Much, much easier.
* With an air cannon it’s often a trick to find a good place to stand when you fire the shot, as often there are inconveniently placed objects line houses, trees, etc. in the way. You don’t have that problem with the drone.
* if you don’t have a good takeoff/landing area for the drone, and a clear flight path to get the line over the tree, you would be stuck.
* the tree I put the ilne over was about 85 feet tall. I put the line over a branch that is right at the top, a placement that’s hard to achieve with an air cannon. The same quality placement could be done without increased difficulty and trees 150-200 feet high. The altitude simply makes no difference.

Having worked out how to do all this I’d like to spread the knowledge far and wide and I’d like to get some practice by putting up lines for anyone who might want it done. If you want lines put up, or know someone who does, contact me or pass on my contact info as appropriate.


-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!







<image0.jpeg>


Re: hanging antenna lines with a drone

Howard E. Mahran / WA1HEM
 

That is awesome! What antenna are you going to hang?

On Jun 1, 2020, at 1:26 PM, Paul Zoba <pezoba@...> wrote:

Butzi Air Services was a success!



Paul graciously came to my home and placed a line over a Douglas Fir next to my driveway. I believe he said the tree is 123’ tall. We managed to get the line right over the top. I’m going to need longer coax!

Paul, thank you again! I appreciate the help. And I will be happy to assist with line installs for anyone else.

73,

Paul
W7PEZ
On May 29, 2020, at 1:16 PM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...> wrote:

A number of folks have been eagerly awaiting a progress report on my efforts to hang antenna support lines using a drone.

This afternoon I successfully put a rope in an excellent placement over a 85 foot tall Douglas Fir.

Equipment is:
* DJI Mavic Pro Platinum drone
* dronefishing.com payload release
* drop weight consisting of a tennis ball with 200 grams of pennies inside and a wire loop threaded through the ball.
* Teflon coated Spectra fishing line
* bright orange nylon twine

Process:

One end of a 1.5m long length of fishing line has a loop that is captured and then release by the payload release.  The other end is attached to the tennis ball.  The fishing line to be place over the tree is tied to the tennis ball as well.

Step 1:
fire up the drone and lift off, hover at about 6 feet.  With the drone hovering, place the loop in the line that goes to the tennis ball into the payload release and close the release, so that the tennis ball is now on the ground, a short line runs up to the payload release.  The fishing line to go over the tree goes to the spool held by your Trusty Assistant.

Step 2:
fly the drone up and on to the approach path to the tree you want the line to go over.  With the camera horizontal, fly up until the highest part of the target tree is now below the horizon on the camera, and note the altitude.  Ascend another 10-15 feet so you are sure the tennis ball will clear the tree as you fly over.  While you ascend your Trusty Assistant is letting the line pay out and keeping it from tangling in everything including the line itself.

Step 3: fly over the tree, taking care to pick a path that will place the fishing line trailing behind the tennis ball over the limb you want.  It helps if at this point the camera is pointed directly down.

Step 4: once the drone has passed over the tree and you’re directly above the spot you want the weight to hit when it’s dropped, make sure the target area is free of people, kittens, puppies, and other items of value.  If it’s clear, hit the button to release the tennis ball, and watch in rapt admiration as the ball drops neatly onto the exact spot you had selected.  it’s best to give Trusty Assistant a heads up just before you hit the release, so they can be prepared to let the line spool out freely as the ball drops.

Step 5:
Fly the drone back to a safe landing area, being careful to not hit the tree you just placed the line over.  Land the drone.

Step 6:
Go find the tennis ball, which will be surprisingly close to where it hit the ground.  Tie the bright orange nylon line to the fishing line loop, then detach the fishing line from the tennis ball.  Now go back, grab the other end of the fishing line, and have Trusty Assistant pay out the orange nylon twine as you reel in the fishing line, pulling the nylon twine over the tree.  At this point you’ll be able to spot the twine as it goes over the tree and you can assess how well it’s placed.

Step 7: once you have the nylon twine over the tree you can detach the fishing line from it, and bend on the rope you want as the final suspension rope.  Then you can go back to the other side, and use the nylon twine to pull the rope over.  Make sure the ends of the final rope cannot be lost or pulled up out of reach.

You’re done.  Next step is use the rope to hang your antenna.

Some observations:
* a light breeze doesn’t interfere with flying the drone but will affect how the fishing line hangs as you fly over the tree.  Doing all this during a still period would be a good plan.
* it’s far, far easier to put the line where you want it using a drone than it is doing it will an air cannon.  Much, much easier.
* With an air cannon it’s often a trick to find a good place to stand when you fire the shot, as often there are inconveniently placed objects line houses, trees, etc. in the way.  You don’t have that problem with the drone.
* if you don’t have a good takeoff/landing area for the drone, and a clear flight path to get the line over the tree, you would be stuck.
* the tree I put the ilne over was about 85 feet tall.  I put the line over a branch that is right at the top, a placement that’s hard to achieve with an air cannon.  The same quality placement could be done without increased difficulty and trees 150-200 feet high.  The altitude simply makes no difference.

Having worked out how to do all this I’d like to spread the knowledge far and wide and I’d like to get some practice by putting up lines for anyone who might want it done.  If you want lines put up, or know someone who does, contact me or pass on my contact info as appropriate.


-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!







<image0.jpeg>


***********************************
Howard Mahran
(425) 864-5104
***********************************





--
*************************
Howard E. Mahran
WA1HEM
(425) 864 - 5104
*************************


Re: hanging antenna lines with a drone

Rowland
 

Don't ya just love modern technology.


Thanks,

Rowland



On Mon, Jun 1, 2020 at 1:26 PM Paul Zoba <pezoba@...> wrote:
Butzi Air Services was a success!



Paul graciously came to my home and placed a line over a Douglas Fir next to my driveway. I believe he said the tree is 123’ tall. We managed to get the line right over the top. I’m going to need longer coax!

Paul, thank you again! I appreciate the help. And I will be happy to assist with line installs for anyone else.

73,

Paul
W7PEZ
On May 29, 2020, at 1:16 PM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...> wrote:

A number of folks have been eagerly awaiting a progress report on my efforts to hang antenna support lines using a drone.

This afternoon I successfully put a rope in an excellent placement over a 85 foot tall Douglas Fir.

Equipment is:
* DJI Mavic Pro Platinum drone
* dronefishing.com payload release
* drop weight consisting of a tennis ball with 200 grams of pennies inside and a wire loop threaded through the ball.
* Teflon coated Spectra fishing line
* bright orange nylon twine

Process:

One end of a 1.5m long length of fishing line has a loop that is captured and then release by the payload release.  The other end is attached to the tennis ball.  The fishing line to be place over the tree is tied to the tennis ball as well.

Step 1:
fire up the drone and lift off, hover at about 6 feet.  With the drone hovering, place the loop in the line that goes to the tennis ball into the payload release and close the release, so that the tennis ball is now on the ground, a short line runs up to the payload release.  The fishing line to go over the tree goes to the spool held by your Trusty Assistant.

Step 2:
fly the drone up and on to the approach path to the tree you want the line to go over.  With the camera horizontal, fly up until the highest part of the target tree is now below the horizon on the camera, and note the altitude.  Ascend another 10-15 feet so you are sure the tennis ball will clear the tree as you fly over.  While you ascend your Trusty Assistant is letting the line pay out and keeping it from tangling in everything including the line itself.

Step 3: fly over the tree, taking care to pick a path that will place the fishing line trailing behind the tennis ball over the limb you want.  It helps if at this point the camera is pointed directly down.

Step 4: once the drone has passed over the tree and you’re directly above the spot you want the weight to hit when it’s dropped, make sure the target area is free of people, kittens, puppies, and other items of value.  If it’s clear, hit the button to release the tennis ball, and watch in rapt admiration as the ball drops neatly onto the exact spot you had selected.  it’s best to give Trusty Assistant a heads up just before you hit the release, so they can be prepared to let the line spool out freely as the ball drops.

Step 5:
Fly the drone back to a safe landing area, being careful to not hit the tree you just placed the line over.  Land the drone.

Step 6:
Go find the tennis ball, which will be surprisingly close to where it hit the ground.  Tie the bright orange nylon line to the fishing line loop, then detach the fishing line from the tennis ball.  Now go back, grab the other end of the fishing line, and have Trusty Assistant pay out the orange nylon twine as you reel in the fishing line, pulling the nylon twine over the tree.  At this point you’ll be able to spot the twine as it goes over the tree and you can assess how well it’s placed.

Step 7: once you have the nylon twine over the tree you can detach the fishing line from it, and bend on the rope you want as the final suspension rope.  Then you can go back to the other side, and use the nylon twine to pull the rope over.  Make sure the ends of the final rope cannot be lost or pulled up out of reach.

You’re done.  Next step is use the rope to hang your antenna.

Some observations:
* a light breeze doesn’t interfere with flying the drone but will affect how the fishing line hangs as you fly over the tree.  Doing all this during a still period would be a good plan.
* it’s far, far easier to put the line where you want it using a drone than it is doing it will an air cannon.  Much, much easier.
* With an air cannon it’s often a trick to find a good place to stand when you fire the shot, as often there are inconveniently placed objects line houses, trees, etc. in the way.  You don’t have that problem with the drone.
* if you don’t have a good takeoff/landing area for the drone, and a clear flight path to get the line over the tree, you would be stuck.
* the tree I put the ilne over was about 85 feet tall.  I put the line over a branch that is right at the top, a placement that’s hard to achieve with an air cannon.  The same quality placement could be done without increased difficulty and trees 150-200 feet high.  The altitude simply makes no difference.

Having worked out how to do all this I’d like to spread the knowledge far and wide and I’d like to get some practice by putting up lines for anyone who might want it done.  If you want lines put up, or know someone who does, contact me or pass on my contact info as appropriate.


-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!








Re: hanging antenna lines with a drone

Paul Zoba
 

Butzi Air Services was a success!



Paul graciously came to my home and placed a line over a Douglas Fir next to my driveway. I believe he said the tree is 123’ tall. We managed to get the line right over the top. I’m going to need longer coax!

Paul, thank you again! I appreciate the help. And I will be happy to assist with line installs for anyone else.

73,

Paul
W7PEZ

On May 29, 2020, at 1:16 PM, Paul Butzi (W7PFB) <w7pfb@...> wrote:

A number of folks have been eagerly awaiting a progress report on my efforts to hang antenna support lines using a drone.

This afternoon I successfully put a rope in an excellent placement over a 85 foot tall Douglas Fir.

Equipment is:
* DJI Mavic Pro Platinum drone
* dronefishing.com payload release
* drop weight consisting of a tennis ball with 200 grams of pennies inside and a wire loop threaded through the ball.
* Teflon coated Spectra fishing line
* bright orange nylon twine

Process:

One end of a 1.5m long length of fishing line has a loop that is captured and then release by the payload release. The other end is attached to the tennis ball. The fishing line to be place over the tree is tied to the tennis ball as well.

Step 1:
fire up the drone and lift off, hover at about 6 feet. With the drone hovering, place the loop in the line that goes to the tennis ball into the payload release and close the release, so that the tennis ball is now on the ground, a short line runs up to the payload release. The fishing line to go over the tree goes to the spool held by your Trusty Assistant.

Step 2:
fly the drone up and on to the approach path to the tree you want the line to go over. With the camera horizontal, fly up until the highest part of the target tree is now below the horizon on the camera, and note the altitude. Ascend another 10-15 feet so you are sure the tennis ball will clear the tree as you fly over. While you ascend your Trusty Assistant is letting the line pay out and keeping it from tangling in everything including the line itself.

Step 3: fly over the tree, taking care to pick a path that will place the fishing line trailing behind the tennis ball over the limb you want. It helps if at this point the camera is pointed directly down.

Step 4: once the drone has passed over the tree and you’re directly above the spot you want the weight to hit when it’s dropped, make sure the target area is free of people, kittens, puppies, and other items of value. If it’s clear, hit the button to release the tennis ball, and watch in rapt admiration as the ball drops neatly onto the exact spot you had selected. it’s best to give Trusty Assistant a heads up just before you hit the release, so they can be prepared to let the line spool out freely as the ball drops.

Step 5:
Fly the drone back to a safe landing area, being careful to not hit the tree you just placed the line over. Land the drone.

Step 6:
Go find the tennis ball, which will be surprisingly close to where it hit the ground. Tie the bright orange nylon line to the fishing line loop, then detach the fishing line from the tennis ball. Now go back, grab the other end of the fishing line, and have Trusty Assistant pay out the orange nylon twine as you reel in the fishing line, pulling the nylon twine over the tree. At this point you’ll be able to spot the twine as it goes over the tree and you can assess how well it’s placed.

Step 7: once you have the nylon twine over the tree you can detach the fishing line from it, and bend on the rope you want as the final suspension rope. Then you can go back to the other side, and use the nylon twine to pull the rope over. Make sure the ends of the final rope cannot be lost or pulled up out of reach.

You’re done. Next step is use the rope to hang your antenna.

Some observations:
* a light breeze doesn’t interfere with flying the drone but will affect how the fishing line hangs as you fly over the tree. Doing all this during a still period would be a good plan.
* it’s far, far easier to put the line where you want it using a drone than it is doing it will an air cannon. Much, much easier.
* With an air cannon it’s often a trick to find a good place to stand when you fire the shot, as often there are inconveniently placed objects line houses, trees, etc. in the way. You don’t have that problem with the drone.
* if you don’t have a good takeoff/landing area for the drone, and a clear flight path to get the line over the tree, you would be stuck.
* the tree I put the ilne over was about 85 feet tall. I put the line over a branch that is right at the top, a placement that’s hard to achieve with an air cannon. The same quality placement could be done without increased difficulty and trees 150-200 feet high. The altitude simply makes no difference.

Having worked out how to do all this I’d like to spread the knowledge far and wide and I’d like to get some practice by putting up lines for anyone who might want it done. If you want lines put up, or know someone who does, contact me or pass on my contact info as appropriate.


-p W7PFB
73, Don’t forget to smile and have fun!


Re: My HF rig (20 and 40m) is causing hum in Audio/TV System. Help!

Robin Amundson
 

Radio wire wound around toroid a few times. If that doesn't work, turn off the TV. 

73 
Robin WA7CPA 


On Sun, May 31, 2020, 5:08 PM Howard E. Mahran / WA1HEM <wa1hem@...> wrote:
When my rig is transmitting we are getting a terrible buzz in our home stereo/TV system. What might be solutions?

Thanks!
--
*************************
Howard E. Mahran
WA1HEM
(425) 864 - 5104
*************************


Re: My HF rig (20 and 40m) is causing hum in Audio/TV System. Help!

Tom WA7TBP
 

Howard:

Start off with the basics. Make sure all RF and audio cables are firmly plugged in, attached, screwed in, etc. Make sure your radio equipment is grounded. Find out which device seems to be getting the most interference. If there is extra power cord length to the AVunits, trying re-positioning the cord and/or winding the cord to a coil shape.

Make sure your rig is well matched to your antennas. Try reducing transmitter power to determine if there is a point where the interference stops. Ensure all RF cables of your radio gear is in good shape, not bent or smashed. On your TV, make sure you have good quality coax.

These ideas are a good start. If your problem still is present after trying all this, the ARRL used to have a good on line resource for reducing interference to home AV gear on their website, www.arrl.org. Than as always, contact some club member to come over and help you out.

Hope these ideas help.

Tom

In a message dated 5/31/2020 17:08:42 Pacific Standard Time, wa1hem@... writes:

When my rig is transmitting we are getting a terrible buzz in our home stereo/TV system. What might be solutions?

Thanks!
--
*************************
Howard E. Mahran
WA1HEM
(425) 864 - 5104
*************************