Date   
Re: KE7GFZ · Snoqualmie Valley Amateur Radio Club (SnoVARC) A Few To Many Radios.....

Rick Burns
 

Wouldn't be so bad if he'd just clean out some of the clutter, the pepsi cup, sack on the seat, couple of pieces of cardboard :)


To: KE7GFZ@...
From: rwb@...
Date: Thu, 22 Nov 2012 11:02:19 -0800
Subject: KE7GFZ · Snoqualmie Valley Amateur Radio Club (SnoVARC) A Few To Many Radios.....

 

A few to many radios…….

 

 

 

 


Re: KE7GFZ · Snoqualmie Valley Amateur Radio Club (SnoVARC) A Few To Many Radios.....

Shawn / K7ATA
 

Indeed, and given that the car is a gen2 escort (just like mine) I have
to really wonder how he powers all of these.

Bad installation all around.

--Shawn
--KF7WXG


On 11/22/2012 11:02 AM, Rowland Brasch wrote:


A few to many radios…….

Description: Too much! This is a sloppy and and unsafe ham radio mobile
installation! Driver distractions for sure!




--
--Shawn
--KF7WXG

A Few To Many Radios.....

slick
 

A few to many radios…….

 

 

 

 

King County opens Flood Warning Center as heavy rain lifts flows on Snoqualmie River

slick
 

-----Original Message-----
From: info@... [mailto:info@...]
Sent: Monday, November 19, 2012 7:18 PM
To: RPIN-OTHER_NEWS@...
Subject: King County opens Flood Warning Center as heavy rain lifts flows on
Snoqualmie River

King County opens Flood Warning Center as heavy rain lifts flows on
Snoqualmie River

The King County Flood Warning Center opened at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 19,
after persistent heavy rainfall for much of the day brought the Snoqualmi...

View the complete story on www.rpin.org. Posted by King County at 11/19/2012
7:10:20 PM.

Modify Subscription:
http://www.rpin.org/rpinweb/Subscriber/Register.aspx?Update=1
Unsubscribe: http://www.rpin.org/rpinweb/Subscriber/Unsubscribe.aspx


The Regional Public Information Network (RPIN) is a regional partnership
hosted by King County. Content is solely the responsibility of contributing
agencies. For questions about news releases, contact the issuing agency.

FW: [WW7RC] General Upgrade Class end of November

slick
 

 

 

 

 

There is a General Licensing upgrade class in Federal Way

 

This class will be on Friday night, November 30th, and December 1st and 2nd. We will be following the Microhams question slide format.and explain every question. It is a great class.

 

The class will be at the Multi Service Center at 1200 S 336th, I would like to extend to you, an invitation to attend. The General Manual is optional. The ARRL VE Test fee is $15.

 

Come on and attend the class. We offer these classes for you. If you can't attend all of the class, come to as much as you can. The Technician License information get you over half of the way through the General information plus the General License give privileges on most of the HF frequencies

 

Give yourself an early Christmas Present, a General License.

Please contact me, Daniel Stevens, KL7WM or Registration at,

 

 

 

Daniel Stevens, KL7WM

206 228 9274

 

spybot

Bob Decker
 

For those visiting the Chinese radio reflectors, I suggest you get
the free software, Spybot. I check after visiting the Wouxun
website, and always get a few malware issues.. It is also suggested
that when using a thumb drive manufactured in China to check for malware

Bob

Christmas Club Dinner

Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA
 

Again this year in lieu of the regular December SnoVARC meeting at the Duvall FS, we will have a social get-together and dinner. This year it will be Thursday, December 6th, at 6:30 pm at the Family Pancake House in Redmond. A separate room has been reserved for our group - let's make it a big one! We will order (and pay) individually off their menu.

DIRECTIONS: The Family Pancake house is at 17621 Redmond Way and is next to the Redmond Inn just south of the end of Hwy 520. On Redmond Way, take a right at the light at 70th street (or left if you are driving north) and after the entrance to the gas station on the right, take a RIGHT to the Pancake House. (If you go left, you would end up in the Whole Foods Marketplace).

RSVP: So the restaurant can set up an appropriate number of seatings, we need to give them an approximate number of people attending. Hey, if you change your mind one way or another at the last minute, just let me know…or just show up at the restaurant. Please bring your spouse, partner, or significant other as this will be a social evening.

Let me know how many of you will be attending by replying directly to this email (bpowrie@...).

Barb Powrie, K7XIT
Secretary, SnoVARC

Mike McMurray N7LEZ

jerrykonoske <gjrck@...>
 

On September 16, Duvall Fire lost one of its own as a result of an off-duty medical emergency. Mike McMurray began his volunteer career 12 years ago as an emergency medical service (EMS) responder. He was inspired by a strong desire to make a difference in the community and his role within the department rapidly expanded to include contributions and expertise as: firefighter, boat operator/instructor, EMS instructor, emergency driving instructor, CPR instructor, and public educator. In each of these endeavors, he applied himself fully to master the task; ensuring only the highest quality of service. With a heavy heart, we have shrouded our badges and dropped our flags to half-staff in his honor.

Jerry NA7Z

SnoVARC Message Handling Training and Shelter Exercise Nov 10th

Dan Pflugrath
 

The Shelter exercise drill is this Saturday November 10th.   We will meet at 9:00AM with the shelter exercise starting at 9:30AM.  Bring your radio.  The exercise will complete by 1PM

 

We have 11 hams signed up with half meeting at Tolt Congregation Church in Carnation and half at the fire station in Duvall.

 

The team at Carnation will be:

Barb Powrie

Chuck Powrie

Jerry Konoske

Bob Decker

Rowland Brasch

Chuck Woolfolk

 

The Team at Duvall fire station:

Glendon Pflugrath

Dan Pflugrath

Ralph Lease

Shawn Somers

Leroy Collinwood

 

We will do our best to use the ICS 213 form.  Will review the form between 9:00 and 9:30AM

 

If you are not on the list and want to learn and experience messaging please give me a call to add you to the exercise.  This is a great opportunity for hams not familiar with their radio to get some hands on help.

 

Best Regards,

Dan KA7GPP

SnoVARC VP

Phone: 425-941-2339

dpflugrath@...

 

 



____________________________________________________________
New Diet Pill Controversy
Causes 10% Reduction in Bodyweight - But Should It Be Banned?
Hconfidential.com

Re: KE7GFZ · Snoqualmie Valley Amateur Radio Club (SnoVARC) Storm Thoughts From Someone Who Just Experienced It

Bob Decker
 

I think to be prepared, and I would do this if I were to start again, is to have a deasel generator that would run on any type of oil. I
have been powdered all the time with my laptop in the camper van. I think a camper van running with d easel would be best. Every thing would be operational,radio,food etc. Stop by a fast foods place to top off fuel.
Sorry for spelling mistakes, I can't see red line under incorrect spelling.

Bob

Re: KE7GFZ · Snoqualmie Valley Amateur Radio Club (SnoVARC) Storm Thoughts From Someone Who Just Experienced It

Heidi Lopez
 

Thank you so much for sharing your experience.

Here's what I have learned from the power outages in Duvall:

I was very prepared with food, heat, water, generator, and general necessities (we camp a lot).
I was not prepared for children's boredom, cat food, and communicating with the public.

Things I have added: candles inside larger jars so they don't tip, extra bags of pet food, several decks of cards and dice, board games, recipe for salt and flour playdough, a white board with clear plastic over it and multi-colored pens, cloth diapers to loan to neighbors or use for medical, baby pins and plastic diaper covers.

We have also taught our children skills including radio and first aid. We do not rely solely on any batteries. We use handcrank lights and solar cells from driveway lights. This really helped in the nine day outage.We were comfortable, fed, and not worried (just bored).

Again, thank you for sharing. 

Heidi
KF7CHL



On Tue, Nov 6, 2012 at 10:56 AM, slick <rwb@...> wrote:
 

Storm Thoughts From Someone Who Just Experienced It

Sandy's visit through the area has taught me a lot.  I thought I was prepared; and for the most part, I was.  But things can always be improved upon - some points for me to remember, that I think are worth sharing:

1) You can't have enough ice.  If you don't have / want / or use an emergency generator, you can't have enough ice.  I bought four huge bags last Sunday, the day before the storm hit.  I could have used twice that - and I should have been making my own, filling plastic containers with water and sticking them in the freezer. As it was, after the third day, I had begun to run out of ice and all the perishable items in the refrigerator had to be tossed.

2) Generators.  Lots of folks purchased generators after their experience with Hurricane Irene last year. That was fine until the gas ran out, then they were in the same boat as me.  Most of the gas stations around here had plenty of fuel, but also lacked the electricity they required to pump it.  I have ordered an 1100 Watt AC inverter that was mentioned in SolderSmoke and I am going to purchase a couple deep cycle marine batteries and a charger.  Once I start using them after a power outage  they may not last for long, but at least I will be able to power up the freezer and refrigerator for a while.

Related to this - if you know that a big storm or blizzard is headed your way - gas up those vehicles!  All of them!  You don't know how long gasoline might be in short supply afterwards.  Go and Google "long New Jersey gas lines after Sandy" if you want a dose of stark reality.

3) Candles. You can never have too many.  I thought I had an adequate supply; and I did.  Our power was out for close to five days.  If it had been out much longer, I would have started to reach the "uncomfortable zone" of running out.  Oh, and if you're like me, make sure your emergency candles are the unscented variety.  It might have lifted someone else's spirits; but I didn't need the house smelling like a flower shop.

4) Flashlights. Forget the big honker ones that use "D" batteries.  I bought some "D" batteries and flashlights, and they are a waste as far as "bang for the buck" goes.  I have purchased two LED camping style lanterns that use four "D" batteries each and they will last a lot longer while providing tons more light than normal flashlights.  For regular flashlight usage, get the small handheld LED flashlights.  I had two of them and am going to get more.  Each of these babies used three "AAA" batteries which are still plentiful in the stores (I mean really, most people use "AAA's" for their remotes, right?).  They were used throughout this crisis and they were as bright on the final day as the first.  Also, those headband LED lights?  Some may consider them "dorky", but I am going to purchase a few.  They will be invaluable for the times you have to do something in the dark that requires both hands. (I.E. - shaving on the morning darkness with one hand holding the safety razor and the other holding the flashlight was less than ideal. Trying to move ice around from cooler to freezer with one hand - less than ideal).

5) Firewood / Fire logs.  I had a small supply left over from the last heating season. I should have laid in a bigger supply.  I didn't run out; but was running uncomfortably low, and it was starting to get chilly here. I would wake up in the morning, and go look at the thermostat to see that the house temperature had fallen to 56F (13C) overnight.

6) Charge up everything!  All my handhelds, HF radio batteries, cell phones were charged to the max ahead of time, I also broke out my solar panel and had it ready to charge up 12V gel cells if needed as this wore on.

Food and water were no problem  We had the stove top available for cooking. The electronic ignitors didn't work; but kitchen matches did the job (I have multiple boxes of those).  We had an AM / FM radio for news/entertainment.  That was a necessity - however, I want to purchase one of those offered with the built in hand crank generator.  This will cut down on the amount of batteries needed and many of these models also have USB ports so that you can use the hand crank generator to charge up your cell phone, kindle, Nook, Kobo, etc.

What did bother me when we would listen to the radio; and the announcers would say, "To report (such and such) please go to this Website ........"  How the heck am I supposed to go to the Internet when there's no electricity?  Also, going through my e-mails after the fact yesterday, I saw there were calls for ARES radio volunteers at the Middlesex County hospitals.  The requests came via e-mails.  How was I supposed to have seen those?  I am one of the last persons in the world NOT to have a smartphone and my "18th century" cellphone handles e-mail, well, ...... let's just say "crappily".  Maybe that's just a personal problem and I need to get "with it".  Not going to sweat that one for now.

The KX3 was invaluable and a God send - thank you Lord, for Elecraft!  But seriously, any battery powered HF rig (PFR3, ATS, MTR, Yaesu FT-817, etc) is so essential if for nothing more than to ward off boredom.  I would come home after work, eat dinner and then .......... nothing.  Too early to turn in, I took afore mentioned LED flashlight and headed down to the basement shack and spent the night on the bands.  I worked a fair amount of DX and even had a QSO with DL3GA who commented that "It is nice to hear a station on the air from New Jersey". Hey, how many times have you heard THAT before?  Maybe, never? (LOL!)

But I was also able to keep in touch with a lot of my QRP friends, including Jim W1PID who would check in with me every night.  Just those brief, continual QSOs did a lot to improve my psyche and moral, knowing that there were folks out there that I personally knew that I could stay in touch with.

This is by no means an exhaustive treatise on being prepared for an emergency - it was one of some personal observations.  But do yourself a favor.  If you're given enough notice that a big storm / blizzard / whatever, is coming your way - get ready and try not to wait until the very last moment to do so!


Storm Thoughts From Someone Who Just Experienced It

slick
 

Storm Thoughts From Someone Who Just Experienced It

Sandy's visit through the area has taught me a lot.  I thought I was prepared; and for the most part, I was.  But things can always be improved upon - some points for me to remember, that I think are worth sharing:

1) You can't have enough ice.  If you don't have / want / or use an emergency generator, you can't have enough ice.  I bought four huge bags last Sunday, the day before the storm hit.  I could have used twice that - and I should have been making my own, filling plastic containers with water and sticking them in the freezer. As it was, after the third day, I had begun to run out of ice and all the perishable items in the refrigerator had to be tossed.

2) Generators.  Lots of folks purchased generators after their experience with Hurricane Irene last year. That was fine until the gas ran out, then they were in the same boat as me.  Most of the gas stations around here had plenty of fuel, but also lacked the electricity they required to pump it.  I have ordered an 1100 Watt AC inverter that was mentioned in SolderSmoke and I am going to purchase a couple deep cycle marine batteries and a charger.  Once I start using them after a power outage  they may not last for long, but at least I will be able to power up the freezer and refrigerator for a while.

Related to this - if you know that a big storm or blizzard is headed your way - gas up those vehicles!  All of them!  You don't know how long gasoline might be in short supply afterwards.  Go and Google "long New Jersey gas lines after Sandy" if you want a dose of stark reality.

3) Candles. You can never have too many.  I thought I had an adequate supply; and I did.  Our power was out for close to five days.  If it had been out much longer, I would have started to reach the "uncomfortable zone" of running out.  Oh, and if you're like me, make sure your emergency candles are the unscented variety.  It might have lifted someone else's spirits; but I didn't need the house smelling like a flower shop.

4) Flashlights. Forget the big honker ones that use "D" batteries.  I bought some "D" batteries and flashlights, and they are a waste as far as "bang for the buck" goes.  I have purchased two LED camping style lanterns that use four "D" batteries each and they will last a lot longer while providing tons more light than normal flashlights.  For regular flashlight usage, get the small handheld LED flashlights.  I had two of them and am going to get more.  Each of these babies used three "AAA" batteries which are still plentiful in the stores (I mean really, most people use "AAA's" for their remotes, right?).  They were used throughout this crisis and they were as bright on the final day as the first.  Also, those headband LED lights?  Some may consider them "dorky", but I am going to purchase a few.  They will be invaluable for the times you have to do something in the dark that requires both hands. (I.E. - shaving on the morning darkness with one hand holding the safety razor and the other holding the flashlight was less than ideal. Trying to move ice around from cooler to freezer with one hand - less than ideal).

5) Firewood / Fire logs.  I had a small supply left over from the last heating season. I should have laid in a bigger supply.  I didn't run out; but was running uncomfortably low, and it was starting to get chilly here. I would wake up in the morning, and go look at the thermostat to see that the house temperature had fallen to 56F (13C) overnight.

6) Charge up everything!  All my handhelds, HF radio batteries, cell phones were charged to the max ahead of time, I also broke out my solar panel and had it ready to charge up 12V gel cells if needed as this wore on.

Food and water were no problem  We had the stove top available for cooking. The electronic ignitors didn't work; but kitchen matches did the job (I have multiple boxes of those).  We had an AM / FM radio for news/entertainment.  That was a necessity - however, I want to purchase one of those offered with the built in hand crank generator.  This will cut down on the amount of batteries needed and many of these models also have USB ports so that you can use the hand crank generator to charge up your cell phone, kindle, Nook, Kobo, etc.

What did bother me when we would listen to the radio; and the announcers would say, "To report (such and such) please go to this Website ........"  How the heck am I supposed to go to the Internet when there's no electricity?  Also, going through my e-mails after the fact yesterday, I saw there were calls for ARES radio volunteers at the Middlesex County hospitals.  The requests came via e-mails.  How was I supposed to have seen those?  I am one of the last persons in the world NOT to have a smartphone and my "18th century" cellphone handles e-mail, well, ...... let's just say "crappily".  Maybe that's just a personal problem and I need to get "with it".  Not going to sweat that one for now.

The KX3 was invaluable and a God send - thank you Lord, for Elecraft!  But seriously, any battery powered HF rig (PFR3, ATS, MTR, Yaesu FT-817, etc) is so essential if for nothing more than to ward off boredom.  I would come home after work, eat dinner and then .......... nothing.  Too early to turn in, I took afore mentioned LED flashlight and headed down to the basement shack and spent the night on the bands.  I worked a fair amount of DX and even had a QSO with DL3GA who commented that "It is nice to hear a station on the air from New Jersey". Hey, how many times have you heard THAT before?  Maybe, never? (LOL!)

But I was also able to keep in touch with a lot of my QRP friends, including Jim W1PID who would check in with me every night.  Just those brief, continual QSOs did a lot to improve my psyche and moral, knowing that there were folks out there that I personally knew that I could stay in touch with.

This is by no means an exhaustive treatise on being prepared for an emergency - it was one of some personal observations.  But do yourself a favor.  If you're given enough notice that a big storm / blizzard / whatever, is coming your way - get ready and try not to wait until the very last moment to do so!

CivicSolar | Solar Panels - Photovoltaic Cells - Solar Power - Inverter - Charge Controller - Battery

Dan Pflugrath
 

As promised at the last club meeting, below is the link to the web site and
company where I purchased the solar panels and charge controller for the
repeater.

Pricing was good but you may be able to find better. Be careful of the
quality of the products you are getting for the lowest possible price. I
went with good brand names for my final decision.

Their sales staff are very technical and can really add value by helping you
with your solar powered configuration. They steered me to the best charge
controller type for our cloudy weather.

http://www.civicsolar.com


Best Regards,
Dan KA7GPP
Phone: 425-941-2339
dpflugrath@...





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Re: KE7GFZ · Snoqualmie Valley Amateur Radio Club (SnoVARC) Consitution amendement passed!

Rick Burns
 

I assume you don't need mine now which I regrettably forgot to do in a timely manner.

Rick


To: KE7GFZ@...
From: bpowrie@...
Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2012 20:45:11 +0000
Subject: KE7GFZ · Snoqualmie Valley Amateur Radio Club (SnoVARC) Consitution amendement passed!

 

Please be advised that the amendment to the SnoVARC Constitution (Article II - Election of Officers) has passed.  A two-thirds majority of all members approved the proposal.
Barb Powrie, K7XIT
Secretary
 

Consitution amendement passed!

barbpowrie <bpowrie@...>
 

Please be advised that the amendment to the SnoVARC Constitution (Article II - Election of Officers) has passed.  A two-thirds majority of all members approved the proposal.

Barb Powrie, K7XIT

Secretary

 

Net Repeater Change

Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA
 

AT the club meeting on November 1st, it was decided to move the Net to our repeaters.

The Snoqualmie Valley Amateur Radio Club net is on Thursdays at 8:00 pm. (Except the first Thursday of the month)

DUVALL
443.250 + (PL 103.5) This services Duvall and the general area
Listen on 443.250
The Duvall repeater is solar powered, so it will be our primary
repeater in an emergency.

CARNATION
145.590 (PL 103.5) is the Carnation Repeater.
It is cross band linked to the Duvall repeater
Input on 145.590 (PL 103.5) simplex goes out on the Duvall
repeater input (448.250)

Dan (KA7GPP) out club Vice President, is our repeater coordinator.

Hope this helps,

Mel
N7GCO

More radio programming cheat sheets

Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA
 

I have added to the handheld programming cheat sheets the following radios:
Yaesu FT 8800R
Yaesu VX-7R
Icom 91 AD
Alinco HT-160T

I have not been able to find a cheat sheet for Lori Young on the Alinco DJ-580. If anyone finds one, please upload it for Lori.

Also I would appreciate some of you who have the newer Chinese Handhelds, to create cheat sheets for them. Thanks

Mel
N7GCO

Administrator of the Yahoo group

Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA
 

Just curious who in the club is the administrator of the Yahoo Club Group?

Could you add Dan, Barb and myself to the administrators list?

I see a few files that need to be purged.

Mel
N7GCO

Propagation Firefox add on I mentioned at club meeting tonight.

Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA
 

"N0HR Propfire" is a web browser extension that allows users to view HF propagation conditions on their web browser status bar. Ham Radio operators and other shortwave radio enthusiasts will be able to monitor propagation conditions using this Firefox extension.

The web site is
http://www.n0hr.com/Propfire.htm

I run it on Firefox on all my computers.

Mel
N7GCO

Handheld Programming Cheat Sheets

Mel - N7GCO - Cheney, WA
 

Under the files section, there is now a fold called Handheld Programming. In that folder are cheat sheets for programming the following radios:

Icom Handheld (IC-T2H, IC-T7H, IC-T81A, IC-T90, IC-V8, IC-V82, IC-W2, IC-W32, ICZ1A)

Icom Mobile and base rigs (IC-207H, IC-208H, 706, 706 MKII, 706 MKIIG, 910H, 2100H, 2720, ic-V8000)

Kenwood (TH-G71A, TH-F6A, TM-271A, TH-G707A, TH-D7A, TM-K2AT, TM-D700A)

Yaesu (FT-60R)

If you have a cheat sheet for any additional radios, please upload the file to this folder.

If you need one for a model not listed, e-mail me and I will try to find on.

Mel
N7GCO